Course Hero Logo

Roswell paper FINAL - HunterWaslicki English202...

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 1 out of 6 pages.

Unformatted text preview: Hunter Waslicki English 202 Professor Mahon Oct. 29, 2016 A Lack of Transparency: Roswell New Mexico In the summer of 1947, an unidentified flying object crash landed outside of a town named Roswell, New Mexico. According to the History Channel it landed in a ranch and the owner, Mac Brazel, had no idea what to make of the crash site, so he called the authorities who, in turn, called the local Air Force base. Soon soldiers came and began cleaning the debris and loading them into armored vehicles before hauling them away. When asked, they simply said it was a weather balloon. Obviously, the whole situation seemed somewhat suspicious as many of the materials among the wreck witnesses had never seen before, and none of the military’s statements seemed to add up. This lead many to believe that it was not a weather balloon that crashed in the desert, but actually an extraterrestrial ship. While these conspiracy theorists make a thought provoking argument, their argument lacks serious evidence and credibility to uphold their arguments. Like previously mentioned, there are many who individuals who did not believe what the government was claiming, that the wreck was simply a weather balloon. There are actually many legitimate reasons why people didn’t believe the military’s claims. In fact, on the front page of Roswell’s newspaper, the headline after the crash said “RAAF Captures flying saucer on Ranch in Roswell Region. This, for obvious reasons, is what initially sparked the conspiracy. This combined with the shaky stories from the nearby Air Force base, cause the public distrust in the government. According to the “The Roswell Incident” a paper written by Charles Berlitz and William Moore, dozens of people had witnessed the crash, one in particular brings much into question. Barney Bennet, a local resident at the time, claimed that he spotted a large metallic object in a field on his way to work one day, so he went to investigate, thinking it was a plane that had crashed. When he approached he discovered a metallic saucer about 30 feet across. He went on to say that he had actually seen bodies lying among the wreck, seeming human like, but smaller. As the years went by though, stories such as Barney Bennet were simply stories about a friend of a friend and were almost never direct quotes from the supposed witnesses. This paper, initially written to defend the conspiracy, goes on to say how there were holes in the cover­up of the crash aside from the Air Force's initial, ambiguous claims. Again, these rumors were very much a he said, she said situation, with no direct evidence or quotes from officials in the military. Not to mention they are exactly as the paper claims, rumors. Another reason many really believed that it was an extraterrestrial ship was the technology involved. Things like fiber optics, Velcro, fireproof fabric, and other high tech materials came from the crash. These materials weren’t invented at the time, or at least the public didn’t know about their discovery. So when witnesses actually did see the crash, it could be interpreted as beings of a higher intelligence than what they perceived us to be at that time. On the other end of the story, the United States Air Force had reports of their own. Released decades after the incident, in 1995 to be exact, “The Roswell Report: Case Closed” was an official document containing previously top secret information, drafted specifically to debunk the Roswell Conspiracy Theory. Like previously mentioned, stories featuring humanoid like bodies discovered at “crash sites” and in the desert, were actually caused by something the Air Force called dummy drops. The reports say that these drops were used to experiment and test pilots abilities to survive high altitude falls. The history channel says that these dummies were featureless, created with “Latex skin and aluminum bones”. Somewhat like what many people believe an extraterrestrial would look like. After these dummies landed in the fields, military vehicles would come and recover the “bodies”. 67 of these dummies were dropped over New Mexico for these tests, quite a few were recovered in locations where the “crashed ships” and “aliens” were supposedly sighted. Also reported in the papers released by the government, was information on Project Mogul. After World War 2, scientists from around the country were gathered to begin work on an atomic espionage project, named Project Mogul. The project used large balloons, much like weather balloons, to carry sound sensors to the upper atmosphere where sound waves travel much farther. Officials believed that they could listen in on soviet tests without their knowledge using the instruments. According to the History Channel, “The debris in Brazel’s eld outside Roswell actually belonged to Project Mogul. It was the remains of a 700­foot­long string of neoprene balloons, radar re뱃ectors (for tracking) and sonic equipment that the scientists had launched from the Alamogordo base in June and that had, evidently, crashed in early July 1947.” The project was such a secret that nobody at the nearby base had known it existed, most were actually worried the wreck came from a russian spy plane or satellite. Leading to the vague answers they had to give to the public when they asked. The weather balloon story was simply the best answer they could give without knowing, or compromising the project. The Week, an English news company looked at research and concluded a direct connection from Hollywood movies and UFO sightings. In 1996, the year that the movies “Independence Day” and “Mars Attacks” there were 609 UFO sightings reported across England, significantly more than the years just before and after. Another report from The Economist shows that between 2000 and 2014, most UFO sightings happened while the witnesses were intoxicated. The Week also showed evidence that between the 1970’s and 1990’s, sightings were increasing at a rapid rate. Meaning, the witnesses account’s always need to be taken with a grain of salt. When project mogul fell, it happened in a time when Science Fiction was really beginning to take off. Comics, cartoons, and movies all were pushing what we thought we knew, whether it be robots, war, or space, people began to question it. Much like the influx in 1996, a similar situation could have happened in New Mexico. Bringing this together, there were many misunderstandings on both sides. The civilians nearby had no idea what to make of the crash, consisting of objects they didn’t even know existed. The local military wasn’t even informed, giving reports the best they could with the knowledge they had. All in all, the cause of the whole conspiracy was simply due to a lack of government transparency. The scientists and officials who knew the real origin of the crash weren’t allowed to step in and clarify the situation, with their hands tied they simply had to let the situation play out. Unfortunately for the theorists, there is little evidence showing that an extraterrestrial vehicle was what landed in the ranch that day, in addition to the studies showing how one's mind might play tricks on itself and see’s what it wants to. While a UFO didn’t crash in Roswell, there will always be those who believe one did. Works Cited Berlitz, Charles, and William L. Moore. The Roswell Incident . New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1980. Print. Edwards, By Brian. "The Roswell Incident: How 'UFO Sighting' Led to 68 Years of Conspiracy Theories." T he Week UK . The Week, 2015. Web. 17 Oct. 2016. "Everything You Need to Know about UFOs." The Economist . The Economist Newspaper, 2014. Web. 31 Oct. 2016. History.com Staff. "Roswell." History.com . A&E Television Networks, 2009. Web. 16 Oct. 2016. McAndrew, James. T he Roswell Report: Case Closed . Washington, D.C.: Headquarters United States Air Force, 1997. Print. ...
View Full Document

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture