Week 4 - 1 What would you consider the three most important facts about the Opium Wars List them in order of importance Why they are important I think

Week 4 - 1 What would you consider the three most important...

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1.What would you consider the three most important facts about the Opium Wars? List them in order of importance. Why they are important? I think first is to the Chinese people and to the West, all outcomes Showed the Qing dynasty to be weak and inflexible, and more importantly, these outcomes undermined the very source of the Qing’s power: “the Mandate of Heaven.” After China’s disastrous defeats, the Chinese realized that they were no longer the “Heavenly Middle Kingdom.” Their inability to dispel an invading force demonstrated that Heaven apparentlyno longer supported the Qing dynasty. This was a devastating blow to the ministerial Ideology, which ran the kingdom and would become a key ideological banner under which future dissenters would rally. True, China had previously undergone invasion by the Mongols and Manchurians, among others. However, where previous invading forces had come and adopted or adapted Chinese philosophy, bureaucracy, and protocol, this new force—Western Imperialism—did not acquiesce to Chinese traditional society. Instead, it introduced a radical alternative.Second is the Opium Wars generated an opportunity for an intense, internal conflict the Chinese army and leadership were disrupted and discredited. Subsequent rebellions, which were able to develop under the circumstances created by the Opium Wars, rocked China and little by little turned the Chinese people against the Qing , as shown in the Taiping Rebellion. The cost of the war and the heavy indemnities fell mostly on the shoulders of the farmers, which helped turn popular opinion against the Qing. As the economy collapsed, poverty and rebellion sprang up all over the country. Third, after the Opium Wars, China intellectually discovered the West, as the Opium Wars ended China’s long-standing self-isolation and self-anointed universal superiority. The concepts of parliamentary democracy and capitalism were introduced in China. In addition, ministers began proposing a radical concept: that China should learn from the West since the Chinese losses could be attributed, significantly, to the superior weaponry of the British. Prior to

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