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studyguide3[1] - Leadership: Basic Approaches 1. Leadership...

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Leadership: Basic Approaches 1. Leadership is the ability to influence a group toward the achievement of a vision or set of goals. A manager is an individual who achieves goals through other people. Being a manager is not necessarily being able to influence a group. 2. Trait theories are theories that consider personal qualities and characteristics that differentiate leaders from nonleaders. Traits usually included in these theories are ambition and energy, desire to lead, honesty and integrity, self confidence, intelligence, and job relevant knowledge. The limitations are that we’re not able to say there’s a causal relationship, there’s a difference between being perceived as a good leader and the truth, and traits aren’t the only definition of a good leader. 3. The problem with behavioral theories is that behaviors can be learned and therefore leaders can be made. This means that anyone can be a leader which is not true. 4. The general approach and rationale behind contingency theories is that you need to adjust what you do to the situation you’re in. 5. The leadership research evolved from trait theories to behavioral to contingency theories. 6. The leader-member exchange theory is the creation by leaders of in-groups and out-groups; subordinates with in-group status will have higher performance ratings, less turnover, and greater job satisfaction. Key Terms/Concepts: 1. Leadership: The ability to influence a group toward the achievement of a vision or set of goals. 2. Leader trait theories: Theories that consider personal qualities and characteristics that differentiate leaders from nonleaders. 3. Behavioral theories of leadership: Theories proposing that specific behaviors differentiate leaders from nonleaders. 4. Initiating structure: the extent to which a leader is likely to define and structure his or her role and those of subordinates in the search for goal attainment (Ohio State). 5. Consideration: The extent to which a leader is likely to have job relationships characterized by mutual trust, respect for subordinates ideas, and regard for their feelings (Ohio State). 6. Employee-oriented leader: Emphasizing interpersonal relations; taking a personal interest in the needs of employees, and accepting individual differences among members.(UofM) 7. Production-oriented leader: One who emphasizes technical or task aspects of the job. (UofM) 8. Managerial Grid: A nine-by-nine matrix outlining 81 different leadership styles.
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9. Contingency theories: The needs to adjust what you do to the situation you’re in in order to be a good leader. 10. Fiedler Contingency theory: the theory that effective groups depend on a proper match between a leader’s style of interacting with subordinates and the degree to which the situation gives control and influence to the leader. 11. Situational leadership theory: you should change your behavior depending on
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This note was uploaded on 05/14/2008 for the course MN 325 taught by Professor Hartman during the Spring '08 term at John Carroll.

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studyguide3[1] - Leadership: Basic Approaches 1. Leadership...

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