shadid - Essay II Jonathan Mann History 20 Professor...

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Essay II Jonathan Mann History 20 Professor Eisenberg
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I remember in school reading about the Bay of Pigs. Ironically I thought to myself, I’m glad our government is smart enough to never make a mistake like that again. Little did I know that our current president would do something that made the Bay of Pigs look like D- Day. The war in Iraq was not executed properly and there is more than enough information to prove it. Anthony Shadid’s “Night Draws Near” provides insight on the war and the effects it has on the citizens. The three stories I have picked out are “Like a Flower”, “A Daughter’s Diary”, and “Baghdad Is Your City”. These three stories opened my eyes and have changed me forever. “This was not a war of their making, many would say, yet they suffered for it.” (P.74) The story “Like a Flower” talks a lot about the gruesome images and horrible deaths that happen in Iraq. Shadid talks first about a group of boys who were killed by shrapnel from a car explosion. It happened at eleven A.M. on March 30, when fourteen- year-old Akran Daif, who had a body “like a flower”, sixteen-year-old Sabah Hassan, and fourteen-year-old Jalal Talib were killed by shrapnel. In addition seven other boys lied bleeding on the street, injured. Shadid then goes on to describe “the blast in Shuala”, which Shadid describes as one of the bloodiest episodes in Baghdad during the war, and unfortunately it happened during the most crowded time of the day. “When the explosive landed, the people heard no blast and saw no fire; there was only a shower of razor-sharp shrapnel that
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shattered glass and sliced through flesh. A pregnant moment of silence followed. For an instant, there was a quiet, the hush of devastation. Then the place erupted. Men, women, and children staggered in every direction, stumbling over a tableau of bleeding bodies and limbs. Children cried for their parents. Mothers and fathers shouted the names of their children, lost in a market that had become, in the flesh of war, a cauldron of human wreckage. Dozens were killed; neither Haider nor anyone else knows how many for sure.” (P. 76) Shadid then goes on to describe what was in the streets after the explosion. Residents say that they saw decapitated heads, severed legs, and a
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This note was uploaded on 05/14/2008 for the course HIST 020 taught by Professor Eisenburg during the Spring '08 term at Hofstra University.

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shadid - Essay II Jonathan Mann History 20 Professor...

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