Music 011 NOTE - Music 011 NOTE Lesson Objectives recognize classical music as a term used to describe European art music of the 17th 18th and 19th

Music 011 NOTE - Music 011 NOTE Lesson Objectives recognize...

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Music 011 NOTE Lesson Objectives: recognize classical music as a term used to describe European art music of the 17 th, 18 th, and 19 th centuries recognize the stylistic eras of Baroque , Classical , and Romantic identify tonality as the musical language of classical music identify Johann Sebastian Bach as one of the great Baroque composers identify Frederic Chopin as one of the great Romantic composers recognize the four principal instrument groups in a classical orchestra recognize the importance of cultural surroundings in providing context for a work of art Our study will focus on the last 500 years, with emphasis on the late-seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. These were the years of classical music , a term we use to describe a rich variety of music that spans the better part of 300 years. We normally divide the music from these centuries into three stylistic eras: Baroque ( 1 600-1 750 ), Classical ( 1 750-1 825 ), and Romantic ( 1 825-1 900 ). In tonality , there is one note that serves as the tonal center, called the tonic For now, let me share a couple of short pieces by two of my favorite composers , Johann Sebastian Bach and Frederic Chopin. Johann Sebastian Bach ( 1 685-1 750 ) is one of the greatest composers in the history of Western art music. His music belongs to an era known as Baroque . The piece by Bach we just heard was composed around 1 720.
Frederic Chopin , one of the great Romantic composers. Let’s listen to Chopin’s Prelude No. 4 in E minor, composed around 1 838 . We’ll examine the four principal instrument groups of the orchestra ( strings , woodwinds , brass , and percussion ) Lesson 2 The black keys are referred to as either sharp (#) or flat (b), depending on whether they are a half-step above (#) or below ( b ) the letter name note. A half-step , or semitone , is the distance between two adjacent keys. Adjacent keys are any two keys directly next to each other, such as C to C# (white to black), C# to D (black to white), or E to F (white to white). Notice that two black keys are never adjacent keys. A whole-step , or whole tone , is equal to two half-steps. Examples of whole-steps are: C to D (white to white), C# to D# (black to black), E to F# (white to black), and Bb to C (black to white). C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C. you reach the number 8 . That’s an octave. And the reason they sound so much alike is that the second C is twice the frequency of the first C. Their frequency ratio is 2 : 1 . Two notes an octave apart sound so similar that we call the two notes by the same letter name, and if they are played at the same time, they sound much like a single two or more pitches sound at the same time . This phenomenon is known as octave equivalence . chromatic scale
Piano Key Location on the Keyboard C immediately to the left of the two black-key set D between the first and second keys of the two black-key set E immediately to the right of the two black-key set F immediately to the left of the three black-key set G between the first and second keys of the three black-key set A between the second and third keys of the three black-key set B

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