CRJ325 Case Study 3 SUBMITTED - Running Head CASE STUDY 3 Case Study 3 Confessions and Admissions After a Request for A Lawyer Amanda Granados Professor

CRJ325 Case Study 3 SUBMITTED - Running Head CASE STUDY 3...

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Running Head: CASE STUDY 3 Case Study 3: Confessions and Admissions After a Request for A Lawyer Amanda Granados Professor Abreu Criminal Procedure November 28, 2016
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CASE STUDY 3 Miranda v. Arizona , 384, U.S. 436, set forth the Miranda Rights. Police are obligated to read these rights to those being arrested and/or interrogated (Del Carmen, 2014). One crucial statement within the Miranda warnings is You have the right to counsel and have that counsel present during the interrogation, if you cannot afford a lawyer, one will be appointed to you ( Miranda v. Arizona, 1966). In the 1981 case of Edwards v. Arizona , 451 U.S. 477 the rule prohibiting police officers from starting an interrogation of a suspect who has requested legal counsel before such counsel has been provided was created. This rule became known as Edwards Rule. Miranda Rights and the Edwards Rule play very important parts in the case involving Officer Jones and the shoplifting suspect.
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