u8d1 - Contribution to Society My topic is Internet...

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Contribution to Society My topic is Internet addiction disorder (IAD) and I chose the cognitive school of thought because I am focusing my research on the cognitive functions such as attention, memory, behavior, and reasoning (Eysenck & Keane, 2015). Some of the methods I find to be helpful in studying IAD are functional MRI (fMRI), CT scan research (Mather, Cacioppo, & Kanwisher, 2013), and the various IAD tests and questionnaires. According to Wallace (2014) and the most often used Internet addiction tests (Lai et al., 2015), the criteria to determine whether someone has IAD are: negative outcomes, compulsive use, salience, mood regulation, social comfort, withdrawal symptoms, and escapism. In fact, each of the IAD tests I have chosen, which are Young’s Internet Addiction Test (YIAT), Compulsive Internet Usage Scale (CIUS), Generalized Problematic Internet Use Scale 2 (GPIUS2), and the Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire (PIUQ), all ask the same type of questions (Israelashvili, Kim, & Bukobza, 2012; Tserkovnikova, Shchipanova, Uskova, Puzyrev, & Fedotovskih, 2016). Some of these questions ask how long they are spending online and if they are losing sleep or getting bad grades (King, Delfabbro, Griffiths, & Gradisar, 2012). It all boils down to the criteria listed on the IAT (Lai et al., 2015). So, by these standards, these seven criteria are sufficient in determining whether an individual has IAD. The answers to the above questionnaires and tests will be helpful for me in describing the answer my first two research questions.
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