Analysis of a baboon statue from Ancient Egypt

Analysis of a baboon statue from Ancient Egypt - Elizabeth...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Elizabeth S Object Paper March 13, 2007 Land of the Pharoahs: NELC 062 Dr. Wegner In ancient Egypt, the dog-faced baboon was an important symbol. To the average Egyptian, seeing a baboon featured in a piece of artwork in a temple, tomb, or home would invoke several, possibly intertwining associations. During the New Kingdom, two of the central invocations of the dog-headed baboon were its associations with Re, a sun god, and Thoth, god of scribes and divine wisdom. The piece I chose was a basalt statue of a cynocephalus ("dog-headed") baboon (Doxey). The baboon is depicted with a pectoral around its neck inscribed with the name of Ramses III, dating it to around the time of his reign, 1182-1151 BCE, during the 20th dynasty of the New Kingdom (museum inscription). The missing arms, according to the museum inscription, were probably raised in adoration of the sun. The statue stands about 2- 3 feet high. The genitals of the baboon are partially intact, the remainder probably cracked off. Large, round protrusions to either side of the head represent the tufts of fur on the heads common to some types of baboons. The face of the statue is dog-like in appearance. The wavy, scaly texture on the sides of the statue seems to represent fur on the body. The basalt that was used to make this statue is a type of igneous rock, formed from the crystallization of molten rock of volcanic lava flows. Among other igneous rocks used by the ancient Egyptians, the basalt came from the Faiyum in the Western Desert, while other igneous rocks such as diorite were quarried from the Eastern Desert. Basalt was used mainly in pyramid capstones of the Old and Middle Kingdoms, temple pavements of the Old Kingdom, Late Period Sarcophagi, and statues of any size in the Late through Roman periods. (Harell) Ramses III, considered the last significant king of the New Kingdom, ruled for 65 years. His reign was peaceful until the fifth year, and in that time the king began his
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Elizabeth S Object Paper March 13, 2007 Land of the Pharoahs: NELC 062 Dr. Wegner construction of the temple complex Medinet Habu, which would not be completed until his 12th year of rule. In the years between, he fought several enemies of Egypt who attempted to invade: Libu, Proto-Hellenic Seas Peoples, and Libyan tribes led by the Meshwesh. Ramses III also possibly fought a campaign against the Syrians. Egypt prospered as a result of the successful handling of the wars. In year 15, temples across the country were given workers, cattle, and riches after an audit. Around year 20, expeditions brought back various treasures from Punt, Timna, and Serabit el-Khadim, and new temples were built in various parts of the country, such as the station temple of the king at Karnak and the nearby Khonsu temple. Ramses III celebrated his
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 6

Analysis of a baboon statue from Ancient Egypt - Elizabeth...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online