IBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome...

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder characterized most commonly by cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. “As many as twenty percent of the adult population, or one in five Americans, have symptoms of IBS” (National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse). Furthermore, IBS occurs more often in women than in men, and it begins before the age of 35 in about fifty percent of people (NDDIC). According to Dr. Marwan Abougergi from John Hopkins Hospital, there are two ways that a person can develop IBS. The first one is through inheritance from the parents. It is referred as primary IBS. “It is believed that it is like hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and that it is coded by several genes that are transmitted from parents to children.” (Dr. Abougergi). The second way to develop IBS is after an episode of bacterial intestinal infection. It is referred as secondary IBS. Irritable bowel syndrome is a disorder involving intestinal motility. “The intestine is usually normal in anatomy, but its function is disrupted. This in turn is manifested by diarrhea at times and constipation at others, along with abdominal pain and bloating” (Dr. Abougergi). IBS its difficult to treat because the symptoms increase and decrease at times
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IBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome...

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