sociology-Wars on Drugs-124400179

sociology-Wars on Drugs-124400179 - Surname 1 Name...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Surname 1 Name: Instructor: Course: Date: Sociology: The War on Drugs According to the policy experts and authors, several disparities on race arise in prosecutions, imprisonments, arrests and several other aspects related to the war on drugs. During the year 1986, the anti-drug abuse act created a 100-1 sentencing disparity for possession of cocaine powder versus crack. This law was regarded as a racist act that victimizes the minorities who are most likely to poses crack rather than the cocaine powder. The law explicitly stated that those convicted in the court of justice for possession of five grams of crack cocaine would receive a five-year sentence term in prison. However, possession of 500 grams of powder cocaine has similar sentence case as that of possession of 5 grams of crack. In 1994, one policy expert, Michael Tonry wrote that the fight against drugs has intensified racial disparities in a way that promoting political and ethical defense was not likely to realize their designated objectives and were anticipated to poses adverse effects on the Black- Americans. However, the black Americans were more likely to be targets of law implementations on drug offenses and were sentenced and penalized more than the Americans. A study done by the American Civil and the Liberty Union showed that the blacks in the US were highly prone to arrests three times more for possession of marijuana than the whites despite the fact that both races have same degrees of marijuana use. Among all the states in the United States, Lowa gave a high number of the black Americans arrested due to utilization and possession of marijuana.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Surname 2 The difference in rates of arrests among both the black and the whites in America was because the whites are less likely to access and purchase marijuana in the open from strangers away from their home country as compared to the blacks. As time proceeded, the racial disparities in prosecutions, arrests, penalties, deaths and sentencing, rose to higher percentages. The African- Americans, who only consisted of a small proportion of regular drug users, made up to 55% conviction cases, 74% imprisonments charged for possessing drugs and another 35% were arrested for owning the drugs. Despite these disparities, the levels of drug use among both the whites and the African-Americans were comparable; this meant that the minorities (African–Americans) were racially discriminated concerning the issues of drug offenses and other non-drug offenses. The fight against drugs has locked up many African-Americans; this damage has gone far beyond to the extent that it is far from individual control and has led to adverse effects on the families and the societies as a whole. This high incarceration has not left aside the children, families, mothers or even fathers. The disparity has led to the lack of parental figures in this
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern