Zombies and the US Society-1520344

Zombies and the US Society-1520344 - Surname 1 Name...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Surname: 1 Name Instructor Course Date Sociology: Zombies and the US Culture Role of Zombies in US Culture The Zombies are the perfect examples of discovering apocalyptic fears when a mature person does not know what to fear most, zombies are perfect in exploring all kinds of fears. The zombies encompass fear of terrorism, gun violence, terminal illnesses, deaths, pandemics, HIV/AIDS, collapse in the economy, destruction, poverty and wars among others. Only zombies give us a chance to dream towards saving the world and most importantly remind us that most of the time we spend doing non-constructive activities other than designing ways and coming up with plans on how to encounter epidemics. Therefore, it is important to note that the zombie pandemic is on the rise, and research about the zombies is essential to the American culture and the survival of the human society. There are things that a lot scarier that the Zombies, but the society tries to avoid talking about them, a discussion concerning the HIV pandemic could clear a whole audience, but if you touch on the zombies, you get an entire audience. Several researchers have come up with articles, stories, films and movies about the zombies; Bela Lugosi produces a film “White Zombie” that depicted the zombies as representations of fear of loss of the white control over the world. In “The Night of the Living Dead,” George Romero showed the film to a captivated crowd in a
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Surname: 2 village in the West of New York, the film was a zombie fiction, and it demonstrated how people responded to fears and pandemics. Therefore, a zombie in the US culture is significant in depicting human fears such as racism, pandemics, economic and societal changes, depersonalization of humankind and threats including how those risks affect the people. The Night of the Living Dead movie is about catastrophe (apocalypse), the cultural critic on such a film points out on the American society that is fond of developing deep physiological attachments to apocalypse images. The people’s continuous anxiety concerning the catastrophe signifies the American’s concerns on rapid changes in the society and their aims to preserve their social status. Unlike other films, “the Night of the Living Dead” does not offer a better ending after the tragedy; instead, it presents another calamity where the hero who was supposed to save the world dies. The tragedy has a symbolic reference to the political nature of the American culture, showing the death of not only the great leaders but also those of the heroes and the ordinary people struggling to achieve democracy.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern