Significance of Abraham

Significance of Abraham - Roach - 1 - The Significance of...

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Roach - 1 - The Significance of Abraham in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Alea Roach A05760824 3.16.07
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Roach - 2 - Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are diverse faiths, with many variances, especially concerning history and message. These religions have many commonalities, yet they are also very different from one another. One of the most basic, yet most important commonalities between these religions is that these faiths are known as the three Abrahamic traditions, because all of these faiths place a huge significance on Abraham as a founder or father of the faith. Within the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Koran, Abraham is depicted in many different ways, however in all these, he is depicted as a father of the faith, and a righteous man. Throughout these books, Abraham as a father of the faith, a religious symbol, a leader, and an inspiration, and an example. Within Judaism and the ongoing history of the Israelites, one of the most important aspects of the portrayal of Abraham is that he is depicted as a father of the Jewish nation. In the Hebrew Bible, Abraham serves as a father of the Jewish faith and the Israelites, as well as a mediator between God and his people, one who is favored by God. The first recording of a dialogue between God and Abraham is in Genesis 12:2, God says to Abraham, “‘I will make you into a great nation and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.’” Later, in Genesis 13, God says to Abraham “‘Lift up your eyes from where you are and look north and south, east and west. All the land that you see I will give to you and your offspring forever. I will make your offspring like the dust of the earth, so that if anyone could count the dust, then your offspring could be counted.” These passages portray Abraham as the future father of a great nation, that is, the Israelites or the Jews. The Jews claim that they are descendants of Abraham, and they are the great nation that he will father. Within these passages, it is important that Abraham is portrayed as the father of the nation, from which the greatest nation on earth will rise.
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Roach - 3 - Aside from Abraham being the physical father of the Jewish people, he is also portrayed as being the father of the faith. Also, from his descendants emerged the twelve tribes of Israel, from which all Jews (and only Jews) were organized. The Jews stayed and lived within these tribes for many years as recorded throughout the Old Testament. Many times he is portrayed as being a mediator between God and the people, and God made numerous covenants with Abraham, and the Jews claim these covenants as their own. In Genesis Chapter 18, Abraham pleads and bargains with God in order to save the city of Sodom where his nephew Lot lived. In this situation, Abraham is portrayed as being shown favor by God, however in the end, Sodom is still destroyed. Within the Old Testament, Abraham is portrayed as a holy man, favored by God.
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This note was uploaded on 05/16/2008 for the course RELI 112 taught by Professor ? during the Winter '05 term at UCSD.

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Significance of Abraham - Roach - 1 - The Significance of...

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