ConjunctionSearchOfFeaturesBetweenAndWithinDimensionsOfPermanentAndWhiteboardMarker-1

ConjunctionSearchOfFeaturesBetweenAndWithinDimensionsOfPermanentAndWhiteboardMarker-1

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Conjunction Search of Features Between and Within Dimensions of Lines and Colors FORONDA, Elaine Louise O. LEONADOR, Anjaelou Blesz L. NAÑADIEGO, Dwight Adrian Date: October 20, 2016 1
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INTRODUCTION Search involves actively and often skillfully seeking out a target – the particular stimuli that needs attention, while distractors are non-target stimuli that divert our attention away from the target stimulus. There are two types of search – feature search and conjunctive search. In feature search, we simply look or search for the uniqueness of the target stimulus. In conjunctive search, on the other hand, we scan for the combination of the features of the target and distractors. Previous studies reported that searching a target stimulus surrounded by numerous distracters having similarities in features requires sequential sampling of object locations by focal attention which is reflected by an increase of reaction time a person has accumulated (Donner et al., 2002). Moreover, Wang, Kristjansson and Nakayama (2005) stated that the observers attend serially to individual items since examining multiple features simultaneously is inefficient because the target stimulus is difficult to distinguish when there is a large display size of distractors; thus, making it slower in response time. Also, the results of Ward and McClelland (1989) reported that the reaction time increased roughly linearly with display size, which means the larger the display size is (i.e., more distractors), the slower the reaction time is. Another experiment conducted by Treisman and Gelade (1980) suggested that simple features can be detected in parallel with no attention limits, the search for targets defined by such features (e.g., color or line) should be little affected by variations in the number of distractors in the display. Lateral interference and acuity limits should be the only factors tending to increase search times as display size increased, perhaps by forcing serial eye fixations.
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