Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein - Roach 1 Alea Roach A05760824 4.30.05 Into...

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Unformatted text preview: Roach 1 Alea Roach A05760824 4.30.05 Into the Rationale of Saddam Hussein On August 2, 1990, Iraqi military forces invaded Kuwait by order of Iraqs then-dictator, Saddam Hussein. This invasion resulted from a number of conflicts and grievances between Iraq and Kuwait. Whether this invasion was justified by these grievances is arguable, however Saddams actions in invading Kuwait were directly opposed by the United States. Although Saddam knew that this invasion of Kuwait was not favored by the United States and its allies, he did not believe these countries would take military action against him and his regime for numerous reasons, the most prominent being that the U.S. and it allies had recently provided him with billions of dollars worth of weapons to use in the Iran-Iraq war. But Saddam was wrong, and the United States and its allies took actions to stop the advancement of Iraqi troops and force them to retreat back to Iraq. (Slantchev lec. 8, 15) Under pressure from President George H. W. Bush, the United Nations declared Saddams actions an illegal land-grab, and the U.S. and its allies implemented sanctions. These sanctions were unsuccessful, and in January of 1991, a four-week bombing campaign called Operation Desert Storm led to a cease-fire agreement which assured the withdrawal of Iraqi forces from Kuwait. In this agreement, Saddam was harshly warned not to attempt anything like this again. He was ordered to destroy all stockpiles and developmental facilities of any weapons of mass destruction, and to routinely allow UN weapons inspectors into Iraq to ensure that these weapons were indeed destroyed, and that Saddam did in fact discontinue the development of these weapons. (mideastweb.org) In the years following this agreement, Saddam was less than cooperative with the UN, and violated many of the UN resolutions involving weapons of mass destruction, UN weapons inspections, Roach 2 and the oil-for-food program, which Saddam abused and used to fund weapons programs. (whitehouse.gov) After gathering information from U.S. and British intelligence agencies as well as other sources which affirmed that Saddam did indeed have weapons of mass destruction (a claim which now seems to have been false), President George W. Bush gave Saddam 48 hours to leave Iraq or face military conflict. Because Saddam refused to leave Iraq, and in doing this, chose to go to war with the United States, the coalition forces began bombing Baghdad in Operation Iraqi Freedom on March 19, 2003. In going to war with the United States even though he did not have weapons of mass destruction or any realistic chance of winning, Saddam Hussein acted rationally and purposefully by acting according to his preferences and beliefs (or disbeliefs) relative to the U.S. and possible outcomes of war, increasing bargaining power, attempting to deter the U.S. from attacking Iraq, and threatening to inflict large costs on the U.S., in order to obtain his utmost goal of remaining in a position of power indefinitely. in order to obtain his utmost goal of remaining in a position of power indefinitely....
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Saddam Hussein - Roach 1 Alea Roach A05760824 4.30.05 Into...

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