Aristotle - the unanticipated reversal of what is expected...

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Aristotle The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle explored the genre of tragedy in his work of literary criticism. His discussion was hugely influenced on the tragedies of the Elizabethan and Jacobean ages. He thought that a tragedy should involve a protagonist of high estate who falls from prosperity to misery through series of discoveries, as the result of a tragic flaw which is usually based on moral or human weakness. The action of the play should include many things, such as, revolution, discovery and disasters. Revolution:
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Unformatted text preview: the unanticipated reversal of what is expected to occur. Discovery: a turning point in the play when the protagonist and the audience learn something that has previously been hidden. Disasters: here all the destructive actions and deaths occur. Aristotle thought that to be tragedy, a play should invoke pity and fear in the audience. He suggested that this allowed the audience to find a release from their own pent-up emotions in seeing similar emotions exaggerated to breaking point in performance. He called this catharsis....
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Aristotle - the unanticipated reversal of what is expected...

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