ch7 - An argument consists of two parts One part (the...

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An argument consists of two parts One part (the premise or premises) is a reason for believing the other part (the conclusion)
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Consider this argument McGivney, 64, who had much trouble starting his 1994 Chrysler LeBaron. As a result, he pulled out a .38-caliber semiautomatic and shot five rounds into the hood of the car, apparently to teach it a lesson.
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First argument [premise] the LeBaron had outlived its usefulness and therefore [conclusion] it was justifiable for him to put it out of its misery.
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Second argument Premise: The LeBaron won't start. Conclusion: Therefore, it has outlived its usefulness.
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Consider this argument. obvious rhetoric we might dismiss this It's morally wrong for a person to inflict awful pain on another sensi-tive creature, one that has done the first no harm. Therefore, the so- called scientists who perform their hideous and sadistic experiments on innocent animals are moral criminals just as were Hitler and his Nazi torturers.
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1. Animals used in some experiments suffer serious pain as a result. 1. Those animals have caused no harm. 2. It is morally wrong to inflict pain upon a creature that has caused no harm. 3. Therefore, those who use animals in these experiments are committing morally wrong actions.
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Conclusion Indicators Thus . ..Consequently. . Therefore . .. So . .. Hence . ..Accordingly This shows thatThis implies that „ This suggests that . .. This proves that . .. Example: Stacy drives a Porsche. This suggests that either she is rich or her parents are. The conclusion is Either she is rich or her parents are.
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Premise Indictors When the words in the following list are used in arguments, they generally introduce premises. They often occur just after a conclusion has been given. A premise would replace the three dots in an actual argument.
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2008 for the course PHIL 211 taught by Professor Reed during the Fall '07 term at University of Louisville.

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ch7 - An argument consists of two parts One part (the...

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