Cardio Tutorial 1

Cardio Tutorial 1 - Cardiovascular Physiology Tutorial 1...

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Cardiovascular Physiology Tutorial 1
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Contact Info Ryan Luther – [email protected] Jessie Chai – [email protected] Feras Al Halabi – [email protected]
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How to Study for Cardio Go to class! Read the textbook Memorize important facts and formulas Understand concepts and do NOT only memorize Go to tutorials Ask questions!!!
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Diffusion Flux increases when: flow increases area decreases concentration gradient increases diffusion constant increases d decreases Flow increases when: d decreases concentration gradient increases flux increases area increases diffusion constant increases 2 2 out in CO O out in flow flux = = D concentration gradient unit area C - C = D , d D diffusion constant D 20 D A flow = flux area = D (C - C ) d a = = Flux is directly proportional to flow  and inversely proportional to unit  area
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Circulation Insect Fish Amphibian
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Mammalian/Avian Circulation Closed circulation Double Loop 2 Atria and 2 Ventricles Systemic circulation originates in the left heart Pulmonary circulation originates in the right heart. Arterial system is for resistance, and venous system is for capacitance
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The right heart, lungs and left heart are in series. Systemic circulation in series with heart Any 2 systemic organs are in parallel with each other Exception: portal vein Series-Parallel System
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Flow and Perfusion Pressure P = P in – P out Perfusion Pressure Flow Resistance = Flow V t = If P in = P out flow = 0 Resistance cannot be measured directly
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Posseuille’s Law 8 8 8 2 2 2 4 ( ) L L L R A r r πν ν π = = = The bottom term (r 4 ) is important Small changes in radius can have large changes in  resistance
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Resistance In Series Flow 1 = Flow 2 R = R 1 + R 2 R > R 1 + R 2 In Parallel Flow = Flow 1 + Flow 2 1/R = 1/R 1 + 1/R 2 R < R 1 or R 2 R 1 R 2 ΔP 1 ΔP 2 ΔP
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This note was uploaded on 05/17/2008 for the course PHGY 210 taught by Professor Trippenbach during the Winter '08 term at McGill.

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Cardio Tutorial 1 - Cardiovascular Physiology Tutorial 1...

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