HJohnston- Supreme Court Decisions -Unit 4

HJohnston- Supreme Court Decisions -Unit 4 - Running Head...

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Running Head: LS305 UNIT 4 - SUPREME COURT DECISIONS 1 LS305- Unit 4 Assignment – Supreme Court Decisions Heather Johnston Kaplan University September 19, 2016
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LS305 UNIT 2 – Supreme Court Decisions 2 Olmstead v. United States , 277 U.S. 438 (S. Ct. 1928). In 1925, Roy Olmstead and ninety-one other defendants were indicted on conspiracy to violate the National Prohibition Act. The National Prohibition Act, also known as the Volstead Act, came about at the ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment and was put into law in February 01, 1920. This act outlawed production and sale of alcoholic beverages unless they were being used for religious or medical use. Alcoholic beverages was defined as any beverages that included one half of one percent of alcohol. Unfortunately, the outlaw of alcoholic beverages led many people to a life of bootlegging. After the prohibition was enacted bootlegging became a very lucrative business for many of the Seattle elite. Roy Olmstead was known as the King of the Northwest Bootleggers (History of the Federal Judiciary, 1967). Roy Olmstead was a lieutenant on the Seattle, Washington police force. After many years on the police force Mr. Olmstead was arrested in March of 1920 for his bootlegging crimes. He was fired from the police, pleaded guilty and received a $500 fine. The years that Mr. Olmstead put into working for the police, he learned all of the secrets to becoming a successful bootlegger. He accepted many bribes from criminals and with the bribe money, he began his bootlegging business. The bootlegging industry proved very successful to Mr. Olmstead. He became the gang leader of one of the largest bootlegging operations in the Seattle area (History of the Federal Judiciary, 1967). The Canadian government placed a very high tax on any liquor that was shipped from British Columbia to the United States. Since British Columbia is where Mr. Olmstead was getting his liquor, he found a way to avoid the tax. He forged the shipping documents on the liquor to state that it was being shipped to Mexico. The liquor was placed on boats, then
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LS305 UNIT 2 – Supreme Court Decisions 3 transferred to smaller boats and then met by trucks that would deliver the liquor to homes, hotels and restaurants. At one point, he had over two hundred cases being delivered. Mr. Olmstead only had one worry about being caught. He paid officials to look the other way and he still had his brothers on the police force, his worry was the federal agents (History of the Federal Judiciary, 1967).
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