REVIEW OF CHARGES.platof00

REVIEW OF CHARGES.platof00 - Four Possible Charges Formal...

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Four Possible Charges Formal Charges raised by Meletus 1.corrupt the youth 2.impious towards the gods Informal Charges raised by the artists such as Aristophanes 1. makes the worst argument the better 2. studies things in the sky and below the ground.
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What does it mean to be impious towards the goods? "Socrates is guilty of teaching the youth not to believe in the gods of the city but new divinities." (p. 27) Three possibilities Socrates believes in no gods. Socrates believes in gods but not the City gods. Socrates acts in ways that is disrespectful or challenges the authority of the city gods.
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Corrupting the Youth Charge: "Socrates is guilty of corrupting the youth" (p. 27) Meletus A. Argument One Strategy (p. 28) Show that it is less likely that one person could corrupt a group of people than it is that they should be corrupted by a majority. 1. Argument from analogy: (1) Horse breeders improve horses. (2) Those who use horses corrupt them. (3) Horse breeder are fewer in number than those who use horses. (4) Therefore, those who improve horses are a minority and those who corrupt them the majority. And (5) What is true of horses is true of all animals.
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THEREFORE: (6) Improvement comes from a minority and corruption from the majority (7) Socrates is one man (a minority) (8) Therefore, it is less likely that the youth have been corrupted by Socrates than by some larger number of people. (9) Therefore, those guilty of corrupting the youth are to be found in the larger aggregate of Athenians (the educators, council members, jurymen, etc).
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Is Socrates an Atheist? His Defense of the Impiety Charge First asks a clarificatory question: What does Meletus mean? [Socrates believes in no gods at all]
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2009 for the course POL 203 taught by Professor Dovi during the Spring '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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REVIEW OF CHARGES.platof00 - Four Possible Charges Formal...

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