Darwin and Evolution

Darwin and Evolution - Darwin and Evolution When Charles Darwin published his book The Origin of Species in 1859 it was as much revolutionary as it

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Darwin and Evolution When Charles Darwin published his book The Origin of Species in 1859, it was as much revolutionary as it was controversial. Perhaps the reason his material was taken so seriously is that it had well written arguments backed by the lifetime worth of research and evidence he had gathered as a naturalist. In terms of the importance to the field of biology of the time, it attempted to explain some of the unsolved dilemmas of the time. Why did bats and humans share such similar hand structures? Why were most animals almost identical in early stages of embryonic development? Why would humans have unused organs like the appendix? His explanation was thus: “it is quite conceivable that a naturalist… might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.” His ideas of natural selection and the fact that the “species” of animals made slow changes over time revolutionized the then infant field of biology. People were able to use his ideas of the development of species
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/16/2008 for the course HIST 175 taught by Professor Friedel during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online