Jandt8e_ppt13(1) - Chapter 13 Contact Between Cultures 2015...

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Chapter 13: Contact Between Cultures © 2015, SAGE Publications, Inc.
What will you learn? What happens when people from diverse cultures interact with one another? How does one culture learn and adopt practices from another culture, and what are some benefits and some problems resulting from this process? What are cultural icons and cultural hegemony, and how are they theorized and exemplified? © 2015, SAGE Publications, Inc.
Cultural Contact and Colonialism For thousands of years, humans lived in isolated communities, cultures developed largely independently, and many were unaware of the others’ existence The initiation of contact among previously separate cultures has been the major world event of past centuries Contact zone: “space in which geographically and historically separated peoples come into contact with each other and establish ongoing relations, usually involving conditions of coercion, radical inequality, intractable conflict” (Pratt, 1992) 16 th to 19 th centuries: new contacts dominated Euro-American cultures; yet in the Euro-American cultures peoples and cultures from other lands were devalued and information from them ignored; the perception of difference lead to violence © 2015, SAGE Publications, Inc.
Colonialism: Examples Hawaii Captain James Cook arrived on Hawai’i in 1778 and described the natives as savages Edward Said (1978, 1981) describes the contact and subsequent linguistic construction of non-Western cultures as “Orientalism,” process of labeling peoples of “underdeveloped” cultures as insignificant “others” The dehumanization of Hawaiians into “others” contributed to near destruction of Hawaiian culture Australia Captain Arthur Phillip arrived in Australia in 1788; his view of the colonists as “guests” of the Indigenous inhabitants and his edict prohibiting molesting or killing Aboriginals were not long-lasting Aborigines were killed and children were forcibly removed from families for assimilation purposes © 2015, SAGE Publications, Inc.
Cultural Exchanges Throughout history, ideas and technology have spread from one culture to another; spontaneous and unplanned or carefully planned and managed; as a result of interaction, one culture may learn and adopt practices of other culture Example of adopting new practices: Columbus’s voyages The Old World brought horses, cows, sheep, chickens, honeybees,

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