discoverThevenin - What is a Thevenin Equivalent Circuit?...

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What is a Thevenin Equivalent Circuit? Figure 1 shows a circuit that has been separated into two parts, Circuit A and Circuit B. These parts are connected at a single pair of terminals. Figure 1. Two circuits connected at a pair of terminals. We’d like to understand the interaction between these two circuits. Circuit A and Circuit B share two things: the current, i , and the voltage, v . It seems reasonable to ask 1. Are i and v related to each other? If so, how? 2. Does Circuit B affect i and v ? How? 3. Suppose we knew i and v . What would they tell us about Circuit A? To start our investigation, let’s simply the problem by considering the case where Circuit B is a single resistor: Figure 2. Circuit B is a resistor. Let’s go to the laboratory and take some data: R , Ω 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 10 15 i , A 0.476 0.455 0.435 0.417 0.400 0.385 0.357 0.333 0.286 v , V 0.476 0.909 1.304 1.667 2.000 2.308 2.857 3.333 4.286 R , Ω 20 25 30 40 50 100 i , A 0.250 0.222 0.200 0.167 0.143 0.083 v , V 5.000 5.556 6.000 6.667 7.143 8.333 (This data was obtained by computer simulation using PSpice [] rather than laboratory measurements. The circuit labeled “Circuit A2” in Figure 10 was used as Circuit A.) 1
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Maybe a picture will help us to see a pattern in this data. Figure 3 shows a graph of
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This note was uploaded on 05/10/2008 for the course EEL 3004 taught by Professor Gong during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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discoverThevenin - What is a Thevenin Equivalent Circuit?...

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