CRF - Voting Rights Act - Bill of Rights in Action SUMMER...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

IT TOOK 100 YEARS AFTER THE CIVIL WAR ENDED BEFORE CONGRESS PASSED A FEDERAL LAW EFFECTIVELY STOPPING VOTING DISCRIMINATION BASED ON RACE OR COLOR. THAT LAW, THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, WAS THE SUBJECT OF A SIGNIF- ICANT U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISION IN 2013: SHELBY COUNTY V. HOLDER . Enacted following the Civil War, the 15th Amendment banned racial discrimination in voting (see “Amend- ment XV”). Protected by federal troops during Reconstruction (1865–1877), newly freed slaves in the South voted in large numbers. African Americans were elected to serve in Congress and in state and local governments in the South. But when Reconstruction ended, white domination returned. Whites prevented African Americans from voting, and whites took control of state and local governments. The Southern states passed laws that effectively prevented African Americans from registering to vote and from casting ballots. Many places in the South required citizens to pay a poll tax to vote, which poor African Americans could not afford to pay. Many states and local governments set up additional barriers. Many re- quired potential voters to pass a literacy test. Invariably, African Americans failed the test, while uneducated or illit- erate whites passed it. Governments also enacted laws that allowed someone to vote if his grandfather was qualified to vote before the Civil War. In addition, they imposed moral character tests for voting or required a prospective voter to have existing voters vouch for him. These discriminatory tests and de- vices along with violence, intimidation, and economic coercion prevented black citizens from voting in much of the South. The Civil Rights Movement Following World War II, the modern civil rights movement began. Massive © 2015, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles. All Constitutional Rights Foundation materials and publications, including Bill of Rights in Action , are protected by copyright. However, we hereby grant to all recipients a license to reproduce all material contained herein for distribution to students, other school site personnel, and district administrators. (ISSN: 1534-9799) SUMMER 2015 Volume 30 N o 4 THE 1960s This edition of Bill of Rights in Action explores issues related to the 1960s. The first article looks at the Voting Rights Act of 1965, its success, and the 2013 U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down its extraordinary enforcement mechanism. The second article examines U.S. policy toward Cuba, which since the 1960s has meant no diplomatic relations and a trade embargo, but which seems to be chang- ing. The last article looks at China’s turbulent Cultural Revolution of the 1960s. U.S. History: The Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the U.S. Supreme Court Government: Cuba at the Crossroads World History: Mao Zedong and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution Guest writer Gail F. Frommer, Esq., wrote the article on the Voting Rights Act.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Fall '10
  • JohnAbbott
  • Supreme Court of the United States, United States Congress, Voting Rights Act

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern