Chapter 3 part 3a

Chapter 3 part 3a - 1 Chapter 3 Part 3 Group Work • Using...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Chapter 3 Part 3 Group Work • Using the examples on your worksheet, create a flowchart or helpful guide for performing the following calculations: – Given grams of a substance, determine moles of the same substance (and vice versa) – Given grams of a substance, determine number of particles of the same substance (and vice versa) – Given moles of a substance, determine number of particles of the same substance (and vice versa) New Concept • What happens when I’m given the amount of a molecule but I need to find the amount of a part of that molecule? • Answer: • Use composition stoichiometry. • Example Question: • Hydrogen is an increasingly important fuel. How many moles of hydrogen can be harvested from 1.5 moles of water? 2 Composition Stoichiometry • Read chemical formula • Subscripts denote relative numbers of atoms in a molecule • Conversion factors can then be created • C 6 H 12 O 6 • per molecule, – # C = 6 – # H = 12 – # O = 6 • Options: 6 mol C 1 mol C 6 H 12 O 6 6 atoms C 1 molecule C 6 H 12 O 6 OR Example • Hydrogen is an increasingly important fuel. How many moles of hydrogen can be harvested from 2 moles of water? • How many grams of hydrogen are in 2 moles of water? Example • How many moles of oxygen atoms are in 145 g sugar, C 6 H 12 O 6 ? Example • A sample of ethylene glycol (C 6 H 6 O 2, antifreeze) contains 12.06 x 10 23 atoms of carbon. How many moles of ethylene glycol are in the sample? • How many grams of ethylene glycol are in the sample? 3 Discussion • We’ve now performed calculations in which: – We do not change the chemical substance • Example: How many grams does 2 moles of water weigh?...
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This note was uploaded on 05/10/2008 for the course CH 304k taught by Professor Walker during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas.

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Chapter 3 part 3a - 1 Chapter 3 Part 3 Group Work • Using...

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