MC201lectureonFrance2006

MC201lectureonFrance2006 - DIRIGISME and SOCIALISM IN...

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DIRIGISME and SOCIALISM IN FRANCE N. Graham MC 201 November 1, 2006 I. Introduction and Overview -Parliaments and Presidents -Electoral Systems and their Impact I. Key Political Institutions in the 5 th Republic A. The President B. The Prime Minister and Cabinet C. Parliament 1.National Assembly 2.Senate II. Political Parties and Electoral Shifts – A. The Socialist Episode B. Cohabitation
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2 II. Impact on the Response to Globalization – the Lisbon Process I. Introduction and Overview -Parliaments and Presidents (will try to compare the US and UK with France somewhat) -Electoral Systems and their Impact (nuts and bolts discussion today; hopefully will complement your more theoretical and historical discussions to date) III. Key Political Institutions in the 5 th Republic No constitutional convention: -The 5 th Republic was de Gaulle’s constitution and republic; -it was tailor-made to his needs and philosophy by Michel Debre under deGaulle’s supervision -it was simply approved by a referendum of the French citizenry in 1958
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3 -Originally, the constitution called for a system of indirect election of the President; deGaulle had this changed to direct popular election in 1962 -this meant that the President had to receive an absolute majority of the popular vote; if this is not obtained in the first ballot, there is a runoff second ballot between the top two contenders (as we shall see this saved Chirac in 2002); 7 5 year term A. The President 1. Administrations since 1958 1958-1966 Charles de Gaulle (Gaullist) 1966-1969 Charles de Gaulle (Gaullist) 1969-1974 Georges Pompidou (Gaullist) 1974-1981 Valery Giscard d’Estaing (Independent Republican) 1981-1988 Francois Mitterrand (Socialist) 1988-1995 Francois Mitterrand (Socialist)
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4 1995-2002 Jacques Chirac (Gaullist) 2002-Pres. Jacques Chirac (Gaullist) 2. Powers of the French President: (staggering for a Western democracy) -customary ceremonial powers as head of state: receiving ambassadors, signing decrees and bills passed by parliament, as well as the right to enforce the constitution and the laws, and the power to grant pardon and reprieve -executive authority : power to appoint (with a vote of confidence from the Parliament) and dismiss the Prime Minister; appoints the members of the cabinet, with the advice of the PM -President presides over the meetings of the cabinet (rather unusual in a government structure that has a PM), directing the decision making process without himself being responsible to
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5 Parliament -the President can negotiate treaties with foreign powers, but these must be countersigned by the PM and Foreign Minister and must be approved by Parliament; -The President generally makes all important declarations regarding foreign policy and international matters (e.g., deGaulle’s declaration that France would withdraw from the military organization and command of NATO and his statements declaring opposition to British membership in the European Community; 2 “vetoes” in 1960s ) The PM and FM are left to implement
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2008 for the course MC 201 taught by Professor Lynnscott during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

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MC201lectureonFrance2006 - DIRIGISME and SOCIALISM IN...

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