Brief lab report 3

Brief lab report 3 - Electromyogram readings of Human...

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Electromyogram readings of Human Skeletal muscle to determine : Muscle compound action potentials, nerve conduction velocity, and synaptic delay Name: Steven Pollack TA: Ken Goenner Date: October 25, 2007 Section: 01-R07 Brief Lab Report
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Experiments and Results Before any readings could be taken the location of the experiment had to be sanitized. This was done by wiping the appropriate area of skin with 95% isopropyl alcohol in order to remove any dead stratified squamous epithelium. With a clean work area, gel could now be placed on the electrodes that were soon to be placed at the site of the data extraction. The electrodes were then placed in two areas along the subject’s left arm. Aside from the two sets of electrodes a ground electrode was placed by the subject’s bicep to ensure no electricity passed towards the heart and disturbed the internal homeostasis of the body. The first set of electrodes were the recording electrodes attached at one end to the ISO-Z headstage and the other to the subject. Three of these recording electrodes were placed strategically along the side of the subject’s palm over the Abducter Digiti Minimi muscle, the muscle innervated by the Ulnar nerve and the Tendon of Flexor Carpi Ulnaris, the muscle closer to the body along the wrist covering the pathway of the Ulnar nerve. The common electrode was placed first most ventral on the palm of the subject’s hand, then the active electrode (-) was placed dorsally, and finally the most dorsal electrode was the reference electrode placed right below the Digiti Minimi (pinky finger). The second set of electrodes were placed dorsally on top of the groove posterior to the medial epicondyle of the humerus starting with the S2 (-) electrode then upwards to the S1 (+) electrode. (Cabot, ‘5-3’-‘5-6’) Tape was wrapped around all electrodes to ensure a tight connection. For the first exercise the subject was instructed to respond accordingly in three different tasks. The first task was to keep all fingers including the abductor digiti minimi muscle relaxed. The second was to slowly abduct her little finger away from the fourth
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finger and hold the position. Lastly, the subject was instructed to forcefully push her little finger against a stationary pen while recordings were taken from the muscle in a myogram. Note that the stimulating electrodes were not on the subject at this time and all output was derived from the recording electrodes. Attached Graph 1a, 1b, and 1c show the myogram recordings of compound action potentials in the Ulnar nerve during these tasks respectively. Amplitudes were measured for each task as they were mentioned 1,2, and 3. Information is provided in Table 1 and was plotted on a graph, Graph 1. Table 1 Task 1 2 3 Mean Amplitude (mV) 3.4 25.5 137.6 Peak amplitude (mV) 12.4 101.1 386.4 Graph 1 Task VS Amplitude 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 1 2 3 Task # Amplitude (mV) Mean Amplitude Peak Amplitude
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For exercise two the dorsal area of electrodes was now connected to the stimulus isolation unit. The S2 (-) electrode was placed directly over the groove between the
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2008 for the course BIO 335 taught by Professor Cabot during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Brief lab report 3 - Electromyogram readings of Human...

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