Unit 5 - ,trichomoniasis,andChlamydia accountfor88%(Weinstock,Berman&Cates,2004 STIsinPerspective Inthepast,(STIs

Unit 5 - ,trichomoniasis,andChlamydia...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 14 pages.

Unit Five - Lecture and Course Notes The human papillomavirus, trichomoniasis, and Chlamydia  account for 88% of all new STI cases among 15-to 24-year-olds  (Weinstock, Berman, & Cates, 2004). . STIs in Perspective In the past, the two sexually transmitted infections (STIs)— gonorrhea and syphilis—have typically gotten all the press. Today, AIDS pretty much gets all the attention, and considering the fact  that it is fatal this probably not a bad idea. However, if we look at  some of the most recent Canadian incidence data collected  primarily from Health Canada, we will see that, at least from a  numbers perspective, gonorrhea and particularly syphilis should be far less of a concern than should some other infections like HPV  and Chlamydia. Your textbook does a good job of describing the  various STIs; we will just look at a few of the more common ones  here. . HPV - Human Papillomavirus HPV or genital warts are other names for human papillomavirus. It is the most common STI in both Canada and the rest of the world.  The best current estimate is that between 20 and 33% of Canadian  women have HPV. In some countries, it is thought that as many as  half the women have HPV, including half the sexually active  teenagers in some US cities. Women are more susceptible to HPV  because the cells of the cervix divide very quickly and this  facilitates the multiplication of the HPV virus. We don't know 
Image of page 1
what percentage of men have it, but it could be has high as some of the lower estimates for women. Using some of the lower incidence  estimates, it is not unreasonable to estimate that as many as 6  million Canadians could have HPV. With HPV you develop warts on your genitals. Some look like  typical cauliflower warts and others are more like plantar warts  that grow under and into the skin. They can be located anywhere  on the genitals, although men are more likely to be diagnosed by  visible means because they are more obvious on the penis or  scrotum than are internal warts that women sometimes get. HPV is a virus, so there is no cure (unlike bacterial infections like  chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis): once you come in contact  with the virus, you have it for the rest of your life. However, the  warts caused by the virus can be removed with a variety of  treatments including liquid nitrogen, laser therapy, and ablative  (which means wearing away) creams and gels. The warts are  painless, but the treatment can sometimes be painful.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 14 pages?

  • Spring '06
  • None
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture