essay 6 - In late 2005, SEIU organized 5,000 low-wage...

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In late 2005, SEIU organized 5,000 low-wage janitors in Houston, in a breakthrough case of union success in the South. Last month, these same janitors won a four-week-long strike for higher pay and guaranteed working hours. How do these victories relate to the arguments of Ehrenreich, Weir, and Fantasia/Voss? Given growing economic and social inequality, what are the prospects for a renewal of union strength in American, and would this make a difference in reducing equality? How could a revitalization of the labor movement succeed, if it could? Is Houston a potential harbinger of successful strategic innovation, or just a tantalizing sideshow? New unionism has yielded many dramatic victories. One such victory was when tens of thousands of low-wage workers have been organized in “Justice for Janitors.” It was carried out in several cities by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). 5,000 of the low-wage janitors came from Houston. SEIU also achieved a historic milestone in February 1999 when it organized 74,000 minimum-wage home health care workers in Southern California. The Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union (HERE) has similarly organized 32,000 of poorly paid hotel workers, especially in
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essay 6 - In late 2005, SEIU organized 5,000 low-wage...

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