CHAPTER 2_FALL_2007

CHAPTER 2_FALL_2007 - CHAPTER 2: ATOMS AND THE ATOMIC...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 2: ATOMS AND THE ATOMIC THEORY How chemists view matter from the ground up … ATOMIC THEORY from ‘earth, air, fire and water’ to hydrogen, helium, lithium. .. The MOLE … a link from microscopic to bulk properties # particles / mole … # g / mole Studio #2: determining the number of particles in a mole Democritus … ca. 400 BC … atoms: Democritus thought about them A. Lavoisier (1743-1794) … the Father of Modern Chemistry he weighted things    IT IS WITH MEASUREMENT THAT MODERN SCIENCE BEGINS Observations: decomposition and synthesis  Respiration and Armand Seguin THE LAW OF CONSERVATION OF MASS mass in (reactants)  =  mass out (products) a chemical reaction is analogous to an algebraic equation WHY?         Enter: the fight of the Century
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
J. L. Proust (1754-1826) vs. Claude Berthollet (1748-1822) QUESTION: Are the proportions of elements in compounds    fixed?   THE ISSUE: what is the definition of  “compound?” Proust: YES! Berthollet: NO! At issue: compounds of tin and oxygen Berthollet: “The composition of oxides of tin varies over a range.” Proust: “There are only two oxides of tin.  Your samples are      impure.” THE KEY ISSUE:      pure compounds vs. mixtures The DATA: Proust:      Total mass      tin (g)       oxygen (g) Compound I:   4.92   4.33   0.59   1.87   1.65   0.223   9.62    8.48   1.14 Compound II:   5.96    4.70     1.26   3.07    2.42    0.65   2.65    2.09    0.56 Berthollet: Sample I:   6.46   5.23   1.23 Sample II:   4.37   3.74   0.63  Sample III:   3.23   2.67   0.56
Background image of page 2
What did they do with these data? The victor in this round: Proust The result: THE LAW OF CONSTANT COMPOSITION an operational definition of a compound Also: THE LAW OF MULTIPLE PROPORTIONS “When two elements form two different compounds (like tin and  oxygen) the mass ratio in one compound is a small whole number times  the mass ratio in the other.” To understand this, look at Proust’s data …
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

CHAPTER 2_FALL_2007 - CHAPTER 2: ATOMS AND THE ATOMIC...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online