bus346study - Product Layout used to achieve a smooth and...

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Product Layout – used to achieve a smooth and rapid flow of large volumes of goods or customers through a system. Ex: sequential, repetitive and continuous processes Production Line – standardized layout arranged according to a fixed sequence of production tasks. Ex: flow line for production or service Assembly Line – standardized layout arranged according to a fixed sequence of assembly tasks. Ex: cafeteria line U-Shaped Layouts – U shaped production line, increased communication among workers. Process Layout – layouts that can handle varied processing requirements. Ex: functional, Job shop and batch processes Fixed position layout – layout in which the product or project remains stationary and workers materials and equipment are moved as needed. Ex: large construction projects (buildings, power plants) Combination layouts – Ex: hospitals, queen Mary 2 Cellular layout – layout in which workstations are grouped into a cell that can process items that have similar processing requirements. Ex: Group technology – the grouping into part families of items with similar design or manufacturing characteristics. Line Balancing – The process of assigning tasks to workstations in such a way that the
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This note was uploaded on 05/19/2008 for the course BUS 346 taught by Professor Andrade during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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bus346study - Product Layout used to achieve a smooth and...

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