Steel_Part_4

Steel_Part_4 - Steels Part 4 Alloy Steels Possible Solid...

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Steels Part 4
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Alloy Steels: Possible benefits of alloy additions : Solid solution strengthening of ferrite Formation of alloy carbides Improve corrosion resistance Increases hardenability Moves nose of TTT and CCT to longer times
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Other effects Shifts phase diagrams and transition temperatures Lowers M s and M f More chance for retained austenite Retained austenite at lower %C Retards tempering Permits higher operating temperature Can produce a “bay” in the diagram and permit ausforming
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Ausforming alloyed steels
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Hardenability: Hardenability refers to the ease of forming martensite. Steels that more readily form martensite have high hardenability Alloy steels have higher hardenability than plain carbon steels Hardenability (a material property) is NOT the same as hardness (a mechanical property).
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Hardenability: General Relationship : Material + Cooling Rate Structure Properties Cooling Rate Depends Upon: Size Shape Location Quench Quench Material Quench Temperature Flow rate
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Jominy End-Quench Hardenability Test
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Jominy End-Quench Hardenability Test Standardize all variables except location Size and shape – a cylinder 4-inches long and 1-inch in diameter Quench: Material – water Temperature – room temperature Flow rate – flow through ½-inch orifice pipe to an unimpeded height of 2½ inches Set gap between specimen and orifice at ½-inch to restrict all flow to the quenched end
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Cooling rate is now directly related to location (distance from the quenched end)
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This note was uploaded on 05/20/2008 for the course MET 121 taught by Professor Kohser during the Spring '07 term at Missouri S&T.

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Steel_Part_4 - Steels Part 4 Alloy Steels Possible Solid...

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