Bullying Paper - Peer 1 Shaniah Peer Professor Gittleman...

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Peer 1 Shaniah Peer Professor Gittleman English 1 Mon. & Wed. 24 November 2014 Bullying: The Problem with Solutions Phoebe Prince was a teenage girl, who moved to a new school in South Hadley, Massachusetts. She was just like any of the other girls from her school, except for the fact that she just moved here from Ireland in the year of 2009, so she may have seemed a little different with her Irish accent. Prince then developed a couple of dating relationships with guys from her new school, but little did she know that she wasn’t allowed to date these guys because they had already dated her new girlfriends. This was not okay with them, so they started severely harassing and bullying her. Only one girl was suspended for her rude actions, but most of the teachers and other leaders of the school did nothing to take action anyway. On January 14, 2010, Prince was bullied to the point of hanging herself (“Bullying” 1). According to Linda Goldman, from the book entitled Raising Our Children to Be Resilient: A Guide to Helping Children Cope with Trauma in Today’s World , “80% of adolescents report being bullied during their school years” (52). I myself have not experienced severe bullying like this, but I have been picked on a couple of times in school, and I have also witnessed other people as victims of bullying. Bullying is a huge problem in today’s society, and students should understand the types, the problems, the causes and effects, and the policies and solutions. To start out, “bullying is defined as ‘unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involve a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time’” (Hughes, Schuele, and Kelly 3). There are four main types of bullying. First, one type of bullying is that of physical
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Peer 2 bullying, which involves physical harm to the victim; for example, kicking or pushing are very common in cases of physical bullying (Joaquim 82). Twenty-one percent of students report being physically bullied (Hughes, Schuele, and Kelly 5). Second, there is verbal bullying, where the victim is usually called inappropriate names (Simplicio 345), and fifty-four percent of students claim that they have been victims of this type (Hughes, Schuele, and Kelly 5). Third, relational bullying is a type in which the victim is being excluded from a group or gossiped about behind his or her back (Simplicio 345); this occurs in fifty-one percent of cases (Hughes, Schuele, and Kelly 5). Finally, cyber bullying is a major type, and it is defined “…as the sending or posting of negative and cruel text as well as electronic images via the Internet” (Joaquim 82). This has been reported in fourteen percent of cases (Hughes, Schuele, and Kelly 5). At one point or another, these different types of bullying tend to go hand in hand in more severe cases.
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  • Spring '08
  • Guenette
  • English, Ellen Kelly, verbal bullying

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