Gonne and Allingham

Gonne and Allingham - 1 Gonne and Allingham It is clear from the writings that both Gonne and Allingham's sympathies lie with the cause of the

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1 Gonne and Allingham It is clear from the writings that both Gonne and Allingham’s sympathies lie with the cause of the Irish. The police in both works are unforgiving and faithful, maybe blindly faithful, to their duty. Although there is rebellion, it is far from enough and as the evictions continue so does the misery. The landowners and other authoritative figures are just as cruel as the police in their own ways. However, there are those who are true to their duties as human beings, despite their loyalties or nationality. Father Stephen’s, from Gonne’s, Evictions , is caught between his Irish nationalism and his duty as a man of the cloth. Even among the British, his clothing is his “passport”. He is not seen as a dangerous man to them, only as a preacher, although there are those who do scowl at him. Father Stephen’s was part of a plan to poison the bailiff. With the bailiff dead, there was hope that the evictions would stop for a time. When Stephens was called upon to help the sick bailiff, his only response was, “I can’t refuse a sick call.” There was no resistance at that moment, only a sense of duty. Much like Father Stephens, Dr. Lamour was also a man willing to look past the
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This note was uploaded on 05/20/2008 for the course ENGLISH 100 taught by Professor Flinner during the Spring '07 term at UMass Lowell.

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Gonne and Allingham - 1 Gonne and Allingham It is clear from the writings that both Gonne and Allingham's sympathies lie with the cause of the

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