LPP 767 Final Paper

LPP 767 Final Paper - The use of performance-enhancing drugs is a problem that has been plaguing Major League Baseball for the past two decades It

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The use of performance-enhancing drugs is a problem that has been plaguing Major League Baseball for the past two decades. It is evident that the personnel in charge of MLB have been turning a blind eye to this issue throughout the years. In 2005, former MLB player Jose’ Canseco released his tell-all-book “Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant ‘Roids, Smash Hits & How Baseball Got Big”. Canseco identified players such as Mark McGwire, Jason Giambi, Rafael Palmeiro and others, but critics were quick to claim that Canseco was only raising these allegations to make a quick buck off book sales. The Commissioner of MLB, Bud Selig, was faced with making the moral choice of confronting the issue of performance enhancing drugs within MLB. Until recently, the MLB Players Association had no drug testing policy in place, allowing players to freely use drugs to increase their athletic ability and performance. What did cause people to raise their eyebrows with suspicion was players such as Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, who were well into their 40’s were still putting up eye-popping statistics as if they were playing in their younger years. Commissioner Selig finally decided to confront this issue on March 30, 2006, when he formally appointed George Mitchell, a former United States senator and prosecutor to investigate the use of performance enhancing drugs. Mitchell recently released his findings in “The Mitchell Report” on December 13, 2007. The report claims that at least one individual from the current thirty teams in MLB is guilty of using performance-enhancing drugs, with current stars such as Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds, Andy Pettitte, Eric Gagne’ and Miguel Tejada headlining the list of names. A groundbreaking report as “The Mitchell Report” in MLB allows one to consider the framework for the ethical decision-making process that Commissioner Selig went
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through. It is apparent that the 5 P’s of problem, possibilities, people, principles and priority tie into Commissioner Selig’s decision. The problem in this case was how long would MLB let their players defy laws of nature and continue to shatter personal performance records through use of performance- enhancing drugs. The ethical issue that arose in this case is did MLB, in particular Commissioner Selig, have an obligation to put to a stop the use of performance- enhancing drugs and quit endorsing players who were earning astronomical salaries while risking the chance of losing a significant portion of their fan base. The relevant facts in this case with regards to player use of performance-enhancing drugs are quite astounding. On June 30, 2000, Manny Alexander who was at the time a utility infielder with the Boston Red Sox had police search his car because they were under the impression that it was stolen i . While searching the car the cops found two hypodermic needles along with a bottle of anabolic steroids in the glove compartment ii . The charges ended up being dropped from the “claim” that there was insufficient evidence to charge the player with
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This note was uploaded on 05/20/2008 for the course LPP 757 taught by Professor Dana during the Spring '08 term at Syracuse.

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LPP 767 Final Paper - The use of performance-enhancing drugs is a problem that has been plaguing Major League Baseball for the past two decades It

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