bsa 563 Union-Free paper

bsa 563 Union-Free paper - Table of Contents 1....

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Table of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Literature Review 3. Existing Situation 4. Discussion 5. Reference List 6. Appendix
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Remaining Union Free Introduction Remaining union-free is a concern of most companies. Employers may feel they have lost control of their own company if unions are present. According to a January 25, 2007 release by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2006 union members declined from 12.5% to 12%, or 15.4 million. Since 1983, when union membership was 20.1%, there has been a steady decline. This paper will be a discussion of strategies for remaining union-free and some of the latest legal decisions affecting the same. Literature Review At the Union Free America website, an article entitled The Stacked Deck states “The National Labor Relations Act and most public sector collective bargaining laws are written in a way that sees only two parties to what they call “labor-management” – the union and the employer. They tend to ignore the fact that there are really three parties – the union, the employer and, most importantly, the employees.” At www.seaymanagment.com there is an article titled How To Remain Union Free: Red Alert for Managers. There is a five-step approach to remaining union free: 1. Let your employees know they are your most valuable assets. Since a company is only as good as its employees, it is important to let them know they are valued and appreciated. (p. 1) 2. “Develop, implement and communicate both (a) an Open Door policy and (b) an Employee Complaint Resolution Procedure, sometimes called Grievance Procedure.” (p. 1) The open door policy allows employees to speak to any
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management team member they believe can resolve the issue. The grievance procedure normally follows the chain of command. Both of these policies are necessary to help employees reach satisfaction. (p. 2) 3. Regularly, have the employees complete a survey. Being confidential, employees will be comfortable stating how they feel. This can be a valuable tool to aid management in decision making. The survey will help boost employee morale. Should the company unionize, the National Labor Relations Board prohibits administering surveys. (p. 2) 4. Managers should be trained to recognize “signs of union activity.” They must know how to legally react. TIPS training (discussed later) teaches managers what they cannot do. (p. 2) 5. “Have an outside firm conduct a Union Vulnerability Audit, to identify, correct and eliminate those areas of employee relations that could provide the union with a vulnerability area into your employees and their jobs.” (p. 2) By identifying and strengthening the weak spots, a stronger barrier will be built against union formation. The Burke Group expounds on these ideas for remaining union-free. They believe
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This note was uploaded on 05/23/2008 for the course HR BSA 563 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '07 term at Averett Unversity.

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bsa 563 Union-Free paper - Table of Contents 1....

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