03 Using Thinking Maps

03 Using Thinking Maps - Using Thinking Maps Sarah Clyne...

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Using Thinking Maps Sarah Clyne ESL Methods 7776
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Purpose: To use  THINKING MAPS as a common  visual language   in your learning community for  transferring  thinking processes,  Integrating  learning,  and for continuously assessing progress
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The Eight Thought Processes Defining in Context (Circle Map) Describing Qualities (Bubble Map) Comparing and  Contrasting (Double Bubble Map) Classifying (Tree Map) Part-Whole (Brace  Map) Sequencing (Flow Map) Cause and Effect  (Multi-Flow Map) Seeing Analogies  (Bridge Map)
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Theoretical Foundations Thinking Maps are grounded in  constructivism.   They facilitate a developmental approach  to using a cognitive process. (Also  grounded in cognitive theory and align  nicely to the academic language  functions.) Thinking Maps supports interactive  learning as students use the Maps as basic  communication tools for cooperative  work.  (Alignment to social interaction  theories)
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Construction of Knowledge • Thinking Maps are a language that help  students create visual models of abstract  thinking processes. • They are used to help educators scaffold  information and organize it in meaningful  ways that allow students to use this  knowledge to create other products of  learning (i.e. a writing project). • They help students understand the nature of  their own thinking and where their  knowledge base comes from.
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Five Key Characteristics about Thinking  Maps as a Language for Learning 1. Consistent Graphics Each Thinking Map in this language is defined by a fundamental cognitive process and pattern Each cognitive process is represented and activated by a unique and consistent graphic  primitive Consistency facilitates efficient and effective communication in interactive-cooperative learning  within classroom and across school and district 2.  Flexibility of Forms Each Map is expandable to different graphic configurations which match the content concept  that is being learned. Teachers and students have control over constructing different configurations using each  graphic primitive. This flexibility with consistent starting points facilitates creative and analytical thinking.
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This note was uploaded on 05/26/2008 for the course ESL 7776 taught by Professor Lundgren during the Spring '08 term at Hamline.

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03 Using Thinking Maps - Using Thinking Maps Sarah Clyne...

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