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Jon Aquino's Mental Garden_ Capsule Summaries of the Great Books of the Western World

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26/10/2015 Jon Aquino's Mental Garden: Capsule Summaries of the Great Books of the Western World 1/45 Jon Aquino's Mental Garden Engineering beautiful software jon aquino labs | personal blog Friday, March 13, 2009 Capsule Summaries of the Great Books of the Western World The Great Books of the Western World was a project by Encyclopedia Brittanica to identify the most significant literature in Western culture. You can find the list of authors and titles on Wikipedia, but they don't have descriptions. So how does one go about choosing what to read? By using the list below. This list provides brief descriptions of each work, extracted from the individual Wikipedia pages. This saves you from having to click on each link to see what each book is about. Perusing the list is an education in itself. You'll be the hit of your next cocktail party (or AP Literature exam). Homer The Iliad . The poem concerns events during the ninth year of the Trojan War, the siege of the city of Ilion or Troy, by the Greeks. The plot centers on the Greek warrior Achilles and his anger toward the king of Mycenae, Agamemnon, which proves disastrous for the Greeks.[2] It provides many of the events that the later poems of the Epic Cycle build on, including the death of the Trojan captain Hector. The Odyssey . The poem mainly centers on the Greek hero Odysseus (or Ulysses, as he was known in Roman myths) and his long journey home following the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the ten­year Trojan War.[2] In his absence, it is assumed he has died, and his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must deal with a group of unruly suitors, called Proci, competing for Penelope's hand in marriage Aeschylus (Also see Advice on reading Greek tragedies ) The Suppliant Maidens . The Danaids form the chorus and serve as the protagonists. They flee a forced marriage to their Egyptian cousins. When the Danaides reach Argos, they entreat King Pelasgus to protect them. He refuses pending the decision of the Argive people, who decide in the favor of the Danaids. Danaus rejoices the outcome, and the Danaids praise the Greek gods. Almost immediately, a herald of the Egyptians comes to attempt to force the Danaids to return to About Me Name: Jonathan Location: Surrey, British Columbia, Canada View my complete profile Contact Info Personal Blog: JonAquino2 del.icio.us Flickr LinkedIn Twitter Jon's Poetry Podcast Jon's Cool Tools For Catholics Dave's Graphic Design Portfolio (Jon's Brother) Jon's Library Jon's Gift Wishlist Jon's Book and Project Journal APA Check My LifeTime 3:24pm [LifeTime] Recent Photos 0 More Next Blog» Create Blog Sign In
26/10/2015 Jon Aquino's Mental Garden: Capsule Summaries of the Great Books of the Western World 2/45 their cousins for marriage. Pelasgus arrives, threatens the herald, and urges the Danaids to remain within the walls of Argos. The play ends with the Danaids retreating into the

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