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The American Indian Movement

The American Indian Movement - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law. Printing note: If you do not want to print this page, select pages 2 to the end on the print dialog screen. Mann Library fax: 607 255-0318 www.mannlib.cornell.edu
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Paul Chaat Smith & Robert Allen Warrior THE NEW New York New York
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126 The Native American Embassy \ equivalent suggestion from a black activist might have imagined the NAACP, the Black Panthers, CORE, SNCC, and UN. Ambassador [ Ralph Bunche plotting strategies together. The idea ultimately failed, but its vision of unity did win the support of the NCAI convention. Wishful thinking or not, at the end of 1971 it was still possible to believe that Indians of all political stripes, backgrounds, ages, and tribes could and should stand to- gether. They had serious arguments and differences, but every fam- ily had those. In essence, the Common Indian Front proposal said Indians are all part of the same family, and, in the end, the family would always be on the same side. When Deloria wrote his broadside, AIM might have felt fortu- nate to be included on equal standing with the major players of In- dian politics. In truth, they were not major players until the action in Gordon a few months later. AIM had been around since 1968, often attending (and causing a stir at) the same conferences as everyone else. Its leaders—Clyde Bellecourt, Dennis Banks, Russ Means— were a familiar sight. They, too, were family. In this family, AIM was the second cousin you knew growing up (or maybe he was you)— charming, rowdy, a bit wild, who later did three years at the state prison for stealing cars. People in the NCAI, NTCA, and NIYC were the favored ones who stayed out of trouble, entered professions, and often had college degrees instead of prison records. - If this warning of Deloria's to other insiders of Indian affairs had fallen mostly on deaf ears, so had another one that both he and Clyde Warrior had offered. Both of them believed that whoever was able to reach out effectively to the traditional people at places like Pine Ridge would be able to forge a political and spiritual alliance that could control the agenda of Indian politics.
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