Francis La Flesche on Boarding School

Francis La Flesche on Boarding School - Warning Concerning...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law. Printing note: If you do not want to print this page, select pages 2 to the end on the print dialog screen. Mann Library fax: 607 255-0318 www.mannlib.cornell.edu
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
THE BEDFORD SERIES IN HISTORY AND CULTURE Talking Back to Civilization Indian Voices from the Progressive Era
Background image of page 2
38 CRITICS OF INDIAN EDUCATION did not appear in school, and discipline became a central feature of the education that took place in individual classrooms. Even worse from an Indian parent's perspective, the off-reservation boarding schools, including the famous Carlisle Indian Industrial School established in Pennsylvania in 1879, usually organized themselves along military lines. Arriving students would receive severe haircuts, wool uniforms, and instruction in close-order drill. Military-style bands would play while students marched to class and to meals under the watchful eye of headmasters who frequently modeled themselves after Carlisle's founder, Captain Richard Henry Pratt. The benefits of education—lit- eracy, a skilled trade, knowledge of the American governmental sys- tem—came only to the students who were lucky or hardy enough to survive this grim routine. Despite the dislocations and hardships accompanying instruction in the white man's ways, tribal leaders were quick to see the benefits of literacy in English and familiarity with American society. When able to control the instructors, tribes were often eager to have schools estab- lished in their communities. Samson Occum, a Mohegan Indian who converted to Christianity, established Christian schools among the Oneidas and at his new settlement of Brothertown, New York, in the late eighteenth century. In the nineteenth century, the Cherokees employed both Native and white schoolmasters to extend literacy throughout their communities and to establish a comprehensive school system in the post-removal homeland of Oklahoma. Other tribes followed suit. By the end of the nineteenth century, American Indian leaders saw
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

Francis La Flesche on Boarding School - Warning Concerning...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online