North American Indian Art - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law. Printing note: If you do not want to print this page, select pages 2 to the end on the print dialog screen. Mann Library fax: 607 255-0318 www.mannlib.cornell.edu
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187 illustrations, 80 in color North American Indian Art David W. Penney Thames & Hudson world of ar
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Chapter I Introduction American Indian art now Artists of Native American ancestry are making art today, at this moment. All over the United States, countless dancers, singers, artists who will display their work in booths, T-shirt vendors, and fry-bread cooks prepare for a weekend of powwows. The on-line "Gathering of Nations" website lists thirty-six powwows for the Fourth of July 2003 weekend, among them the Navajo Fourth of July Powwow at Window Rock, Arizona, the 131 st Annual Quapaw Tribal Powwow in Quapaw, Oklahoma, the 35th Annual Ute Fourth of July Powwow at Fort Duchesne, Utah, and the 8th Annual Eastern Woodlands Intertribal Powwow in Lebanon, Maine. At the beginning of each event, every dancer, dressed in regalia perfected to the best of their abilities and talents, will line up in order of seniority and parade into the arena led by military veterans carrying flags and accompanied by the singers of the lead drum in the heart-stopping spectacle known as "Grand Entry" [l]. In the town of Alert Bay, British Columbia, several families assemble gifts and goods to distribute at potlatches scheduled for later in the year. Some will feature masked dances presented as treasured family possessions [2]. Skilled carvers in the community, like Beau Dick, will receive commissions to carve new masks. Old ones preserved in family collections will be painted and refurbished so they look their best during the ceremony. Outside Santa Fe, Nancy Youngblood, a descendant of a long lineage of potters including matriarchs Margaret Tafoya and her mother Sara Fina of Santa Clara Pueblo, builds and polishes vessels of clay. Her lustrous black jars, whose ribbed forms derive ultimately from the shapes of squashes and pumpkins, are highly sought-after by collectors and museums [3]. Many are sold before she finishes them. In the recent past, long lines of hopeful
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3 Ribbed melon jar, made by Nancy Youngblood, c. 1995.
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This note was uploaded on 05/18/2008 for the course AIS 1110 taught by Professor Richardson during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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North American Indian Art - Warning Concerning Copyright...

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