Yellow Thunder - Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions...

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Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship, or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement. This institution reserves the right to refuse to accept a copying order if, in its judgment, fulfillment of the order would involve violation of copyright law. Printing note: If you do not want to print this page, select pages 2 to the end on the print dialog screen. Mann Library fax: 607 255-0318 www.mannlib.cornell.edu
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Paul Chaat Smith Robert Allen Warrior THE NEW New York • New York
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Chapter 6 Yellow Thunder T he police found him in the cold of February in 1972, slumped over the wheel of his pickup truck. The truck was parked in a used-car lot in the border town of Gor- don, Nebraska, just across the state line from the Pine Ridge Reservation. Police estimated that Raymond Yellow Thunder, an Oglala from the nearby reservation, had been dead for about five days. Sadly, in a reservation border town like Gordon, the discovery of a dead Indian man in a pickup truck was hardly big news. The only thing cheaper than Indian lives in places like Gordon was the forti- fied wine that was at the center of a border town's character and identity. But Raymond Yellow Thunder's death would be different. In the space of just a few days, Indian residents of Gordon and Pine Ridge would rise up in an unprecedented demand for justice. And the American Indian Movement, which the people of Pine Ridge would call upon to support their efforts, would emerge as the single most influential Indian organization in the country—not just in the cities, 112 Yellow Thunder n 3 where their message had already been gaining a place of prominence, but among reservation people as well. Yellow Thunder, the Oglala whose death was to be at the center of the firestorm to come, was a fifty-one-year-old cowboy. He had been living in Gordon for the past several years, and worked at vari- ous ranches in the area. Yellow Thunder had never moved very far away from the small community of Porcupine at Pine Ridge where his family was from. He returned home on weekends, looking for- ward to catching up on the latest news with his friends and family and playing with the kids. He was a good cook and a willing baby-sitter, usually arriving with a bag of groceries. Those visits, his relatives said, were like clockwork. When he missed one of his usual appearances, the family grew
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Yellow Thunder - Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions...

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