Ch.-47-lecture - 1 Chapter 47 Care of critically ill patients with neurological problems Ok these are just your learning outcomes and these are going to

Ch.-47-lecture - 1 Chapter 47 Care of critically ill...

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1 Chapter 47 Care of critically ill patients with neurological problems. Ok these are just your learning outcomes and these are going to be pretty general for this category on this slide, these 4 categories are going to be pretty general for these categories of care we provide. They are going to be independent or based upon what we’re talking about specifically. The page reference is the first page of the text book of your chapter believe it is page 1029 and that breaks down and specifies what these particular areas are going pertain to. Safe and effective care, management, health promotion and maintenance, psychosocial, and physiological integrity. First thing we will talk about is TIA, our transient ischemic attacks; I am sure many of you have heard of these in some point in this semester, and a reversible ischemic neurologic deficit. Some of these at least the RIND is actually relatively new term. What we didn’t call a stroke, we call a TIA. What you will hear is some people refer to a TIA is a mini-stroke. It’s a small one and usually doesn’t have as detrimental residualized result of these TIAs, but we used to call strokes CVAs or cerebral vascular accidents, so you may see that abbreviated quite a bit now. Book does not however use the term CVA, but as I said before, you will see reference to in practice quite a bit: a CVA vs. a TIA. Warning signs that cause a transient focal neurological dysfunction resulting from a brief interruption in blood flow possibly resulting from the cerebral, can be from a vasospasm or from systemic or atrial hypertension and you, as we go through the text and the slides, will see how significant hypertension is in response to one of these neurological attacks. One of the key words however on this slide is going to be the work transient where a lot of times clients will have several of these in a row or over a course of couple of days where they are having these transient symptoms that are relative to the attack that they come and go and don’t necessarily sort of debilitating or compromising effects afterwards. So with stroke, also known as a brain attack, also known as a CVA, going to be a change in the normal blood supply to the brain. Can be ischemic or hemorrhagic. And when we are talking about care and treatment and management of a stroke or brain attack, it is imperative, absolutely imperative that you know whether or not the brain attack was ischemic in nature or hemorrhagic in nature. It’s really determine how where their plan of care in regards to treatment for the most part anyway will that will be the significant thing anyway. You see here ischemic can be occlusive, I think this fits very appropriately having had talked about cardiovascular disorders. The words occlusive and ischemic how those having a baseline knowledge of what those things really truly mean, get to talk about strokes and CVAs. So interruption in blood flow to the brain is going to be an occlusive type of brain attack vs. the hemorrhagic, which of course there will be bleeding with it, in or around the brain. The brain is unable to
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  • Winter '16
  • Traumatic brain injury, brain attack

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