Review for Final Exam - S08

Review for Final - STAT E-50 Introduction to Statistics Review for Final Examination Inference about Population Means One sample One-sample t Two

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
STAT E-50 - Introduction to Statistics Review for Final Examination One-sample t One sample One-sample t for differences Dependent samples Two-sample t Independent samples Two samples ANOVA Several samples Population Means One-sample z One sample Two-sample z Two samples Chi-square test Several samples Population Proportions Chi-square test Two qualitative variables Correlation and Regression Two quantitative variables Relationships between. .. Inference about. ..
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Review for Final Examination For each of the situations described, indicate a statistical procedure that could appropriately be used to analyze the data. Usually there will be only one correct answer. Procedures: χ 2 goodness-of-fit test one-way ANOVA regression correlation paired samples t-test independent samples t-test two-sample test for proportions χ 2 test for independence or homogeneity single-sample t-test for a mean single-sample test for a proportion Research situations: 1. You want to know whether less than half of the people in the sample could do fewer than three pushups on the President's National Fitness Test. 2. You want to compare the mean number of pushups done by 42 boys vs. 34 girls in a local school on the President's National Fitness Test. 3. You want to see whether the choice of jogging, bicycling, or swimming as a favorite activity is related to which one of three summer fitness programs people attended. 4. You want to predict how many pushups students will be able to do after participating in a fitness program from the number they could do before the program. 5. You want to compare the mean number of pushups done by children who have attended one of three different fitness camps in order to see which fitness program is better. 6. You want to see the relationship between the number of pushups children can do in an hour and the number of situps they can do in an hour. 7. You want to compare the mean number of pushups done by 66 children after participating in a fitness program with the number they could do before the program. 8. You want to discover whether mothers or their teenage daughters own more pairs of shoes. 9. You want to see whether people's preferences for caffeinated or decaffeinated cola are related to their preferences for regular or decaf coffee. 10. You want to see whether the number of email messages that people send is related to the number of messages they receive each week.
Background image of page 2
11. To test a theory that people have no preference among four different colors, you ask 100 people to select among red, green, blue, and black paint samples. 12. You want to compare the mean weights of football players at Harvard and at Yale. 13. You want to determine whether a greater proportion of students in a "poor fitness" category show signs of stress than students in the "average fitness" category. 14. You want to predict a person's college grade point average from that person's GPA in
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/20/2008 for the course STAT 50 taught by Professor Weinstein during the Spring '08 term at Harvard.

Page1 / 8

Review for Final - STAT E-50 Introduction to Statistics Review for Final Examination Inference about Population Means One sample One-sample t Two

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online