TRAGEDY BOOKLET - Studies in Drama and Theatre TOPIC 3 Tragedy The Topic Rubric This topic explores theoretically and experientially plays which give

TRAGEDY BOOKLET - Studies in Drama and Theatre TOPIC 3...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

Studies in Drama and Theatre TOPIC 3: Tragedy The Topic Rubric This topic explores, theoretically and experientially, plays which give expression to a tragic vision of human experience. By comparing an ancient Greek tragedy to a modern tragic play, students will consider the essence of tragedy and the controlling nature of the protagonist's plight. In particular, the role of fate, suffering, hubris and moral responsibility in the experience of individual tragic heroines and heroes should be considered in light of the political, social and cultural aspects of that experience. Students will explore the dramatic forms, performance styles, techniques and conventions in the plays and consider the implications of staging these plays for a contemporary Australian audience. TWO plays must be chosen, ONE from each list. List 1 EITHER Sophocles 2003, Oedipus Tyrannus, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, Victoria.¹ OR Sophocles 2003, Antigone, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, Victoria. AND List 2 EITHER Miller, Arthur 1998, Death of a Salesman, Penguin Classics, London. OR Kushner, Tony 1993, Angels in America (Part 1), Theatre Communications Group, New York.
Studies in Drama and Theatre TOPIC 3: Tragedy Unpacking the topic rubric The rubric asks you to compare an ancient Greek tragedy with a modern tragic play. Therefore you need to identify the similarities and differences of Oedipus Tyrannus to the other modern play you are studying, and account for them in terms of the actor audience relationship. The rubric gives you clues how to go about this, for example: What is the essence of tragedy in each play you have studied? What is the controlling nature of the protagonist's plight: o role of fate o role of suffering o hubris - the overbearing pride and arrogance of the protagonist compared to his/her Aréte , which is their inherent goodness and excellence? What are the moral responsibilities of each protagonist given the period of the plays? What would be relevant today and why? Consider the political, social and cultural aspects of these responsibilities.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture