CJS Final Project - Juvenile Crime Paper Juvenile Crime...

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Juvenile Crime Paper Juvenile Crime Paper Tony Sadler 23 April 2013 CJS/200 Susan Hearn Preventing and addressing juvenile crime and delinquency remain perennial issues in state legislatures today. State lawmakers are central to the planning and reforming of juvenile justice. Policies require balancing the interests of rehabilitation, public safety and preserving the rights of juveniles, while attempting to cut costs and reduce crime. Enactments in recent years have included those that work to prevent delinquency, provide treatment for alcohol, drug and mental health problems, protect the confidentiality of juvenile records, and otherwise distinguish young people from adult offenders. The resources on this web page address these and other key issues on state juvenile justice systems. Seventy percent of children in the juvenile justice system have educational disabilities, the vast majority have an emotional disturbance and specific learning disabilities. Children with Emotional Disorders or ED fail more courses, earn lower grade point averages, miss more days of school, and are retained more often than other students with disabilities. Children with ED have the lowest graduation rates of all children with disabilities, nationally, only 35% graduate from high school compared to 76% for all students. Children with ED are three times more likely to be arrested before leaving school, when compared to all other students. For children with ED who drop out of school, 73 percent are arrested within five years. Children with ED are twice as likely to live in a correctional facility, halfway house, drug treatment center, or "on the street" after leaving school, when compared to students with other disabilities. Children with ED are twice as likely to become teenage mothers as students with other disabilities. In the 1990's, pervasive problems with juvenile violence threaten the safety and security of communities across the country, and projections for the future are cause for nationwide alarm. Demographic experts predict that juvenile arrests for violent crimes will more than double by the year 2010. Given population growth projections and trends in juvenile arrests
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