Topic04 -Theories_Paradigms

Topic04 -Theories_Paradigms - Development of Theories and...

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Development of Theories and Paradigms The building blocks of scientific thought (with hypotheses and assumptions)
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Assumptions, Hypotheses, Theories, Paradigms These are all part of any model of the universe. They are also part of any scientific method of doing science. Together, they reflect the development and codification of scientific ideas.
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Origins The development of assumptions, hypotheses and theories originated in Greece together with the development of logic. A logical induction can be viewed as a hypothesis in that the hypothesis generalizes some component of science and is based on facts/observations which can be tested. Implicitly stated hypotheses were the ideas of the first Greek scientific thinkers. Explicit hypotheses were first used by mathematicians to help codify mathematics into fields like geometry. The hypotheses had associated with them explicit assumptions that limited the use of the hypotheses to particular cases. The explicit statement in science ‘let me hypothesize … based on the following assumptions…’ did not get written down until after the death of Aristotle.
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Hypothesis An initial idea or explanation for some part of science. Describe with mathematics. Specific enough to make predictions.
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Topic04 -Theories_Paradigms - Development of Theories and...

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