U.S. History Term Paper - THE DIVIDED STATES OF AMERICA Morgan Young Block C Due Date Take a pill red or blue Did you take the wrong one Thats fine Just

U.S. History Term Paper - THE DIVIDED STATES OF AMERICA...

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THE DIVIDED STATES OF AMERICA Morgan Young Block C Due Date: 1/12/16 Take a pill: red or blue. Did you take the wrong one? That’s fine. Just take the other one next time, because that must be the correct one, right? Or you could just keep taking the same
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one, expecting the results to be different. You know, Albert Einstein once said “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”[1] Regardless of whom you vote for or what your moral values are, this is likely what you are doing. If we vote for a democrat to be our political leader, and he fails at the end of his term, do we vote for another democrat, hoping a different one will make the country better? Well, we could just vote for a republican next time. But what if the republican fails as well? Then we go back to democrat, then republican, and so on and so forth. Is that what we’re going to do, just keep going back and forth between parties in desperate attempts to make a change? Or, you know, we could just stay in the same dogmatic mindset for the rest of our lives -- same insanity in the end. But what if we vote for a third party? Well, in that case, we might as well not vote at all. Consider this: since the Reconstruction era, there have been 111 state representatives, 30 senators, and 28 governors not afflicted with one of the two major political parties.[2] That may seem like a lot of people at first, but bear in mind there have been a total of 12,238 congressmen and 2,465 governors in our history.[3] That means only 1% of all our congressmen and 1% of all our governors have come from a third party. The rest of them? They’re either republicans or democrats. But the presidents? We have had 43 men serve as president of the United States, and not a single one has come from a third party. Absolutely none. Sure, they haven't all come from the republican party or the democratic party. There have been federalists and anti-federalists, Whigs and democratic-republicans. But they have all been the result of a two-party system. A red and a blue. A right and a left. This two party system has existed for a long time. It dates all the way back to the revolutionary era, during the French revolution, to be exact. During that time, France was 1
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divided. Many of the French supported the king, while many others supported the emperor. So, the National Assembly would divide the people in the Great Hall by putting those who supported the king on the right and those who supported the emperor on the left. Those who supported the king were called “conservatives” because they wanted to “conserve” the old ways of the kingdom. Those who supported the emperor were called “liberals” because they wanted to “liberate” the French people from the old ways of the kingdom. So how, exactly, did a two-party system, originating from a war -- yes, a war -- in France, make it’s way into United States politics? France was divided; the States were supposed to be UNITED.
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