Final- I love string %282%29 (1) - Michelle Theres so much in this profile thats striking original memorable Its a portrait(albeit a rather

Final- I love string %282%29 (1) - Michelle Theres so much...

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Michelle, There’s so much in this profile that’s striking, original, memorable. It’s a portrait (albeit a rather impressionistic one) of Martindale, but it’s also an ode to string. In fact, it’s best when it’s about the string itself. You use many of the techniques we’ve observed in the readings done for class: foregrounding the writer, inviting/implicating the reader with “you,” using contradiction (art vs. craft) to create and maintain reader interest, and more. Other than your string descriptions, what’s strongest about this is the section about physics majors who knit and weave. Delightful! Indeed, I would move it toward the start of the piece, since it encapsulates what’s unique about Martindale’s position as a knitting teacher at a university. Along those lines, what’s still missing here is a focused, efficient summary near the start of your profile of just what Martindale’s job is at Yale. The reader has to struggle to figure out where she’s come from and how she fits in. And just as we’re getting oriented, you introduce Barbara (last name?), who’s so compelling a character that she almost steals your piece. I’m still not quite clear on what Martindale and Barbara’s particular status is with respect to Morse and the University. Also, where does all of this take place? Is there a room in Morse dedicated to knitting and weaving? I had trouble envisioning a scene while reading this. In summary, Michelle, you’ve succeeded here at the hard stuff – evoking a person’s hard-to-grasp essence. What you need to continue working on are context and clarity. I look forward to your next piece. Adam Sexton Grade: B+
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Michelle Santos English 120: Adam Sexton Craft VS Art I love string but not as much as Alexa Martindale loves string. String can be both flexible and rigid, the amount of elasticity dependent on both the material and how you stitch the string. And while more and more people are treating fiber creations made from string as an art rather than a craft, weaving—along with sewing, knitting, cross stitching, crocheting, friendship bracelet making, quilting, macramé—is still a craft to many people in that, as Martindale would say, “A craft would be something utilitarian. Weaving with the intent to make clothing.” Martindale herself hates the word “craft”: It’s “a word meant to describe plastic flowers and acrylic yarn.” It has a cheesy connotation, the word “craft” in that it is associated with cliché knickknacks and bulky knit scarves, not art.
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