EE_10_F07_Lecture 5 - UCLA ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING...

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UCLA E LECTRICAL E NGINEERING D EPARTMENT : EE 10: C IRCUIT A NALYSIS 1 L ECTURE 5 LECTURE NOTES: OCT 22, 2007 OUTLINE REVIEW ........................................................................................................................................ 2 DEPENDENT SOURCES ............................................................................................................. 2 Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 2 Dependent Source Circuit Element ......................................................................................... 2 INTRODUCTORY DEPENDENT SOURCE PROBLEM ....................................................... 3 NODE VOLTAGE METHODS FOR CIRCUITS WITH DEPENDENT SOURCES ............ 7 AN EXAMPLE APPLICATION: THE MOSFET TRANSISTOR ........................................ 10 1
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UCLA E LECTRICAL E NGINEERING D EPARTMENT : EE 10: C IRCUIT A NALYSIS 1 L ECTURE 5 REVIEW Circuit Analysis: The Node-Voltage and Mesh-Current Methods Definitions of Critical Circuit Features The Node Voltage Method The Problem Solving Approach with the Node Voltage Method DEPENDENT SOURCES INTRODUCTION In EE10, we have investigated circuits that are based on fixed current and voltage sources that supply power to fixed resistor networks. We can model a very large class of important circuits with this approach. However, we must now add a capability to model “active” elements. Most circuits include “active” elements and subsystems that produce an output signal (current or voltage) that is generally an “amplification” of an input current or voltage. These active elements enable the development of current and voltage amplifiers and signal processing systems, as well as digital logic circuits for computation. For our circuits, we must add a new source, the Dependent Source. The Dependent Source operates as an Ideal Current or Ideal Voltage source, but, with an output that depends on the value of current or voltage at another pair of nodes in our circuit. The mechanical analogy is to a mechanical fluid valve. Here, a valve can control a two-terminal fluid flow by an action applied to the valve mechanism. DEPENDENT SOURCE CIRCUIT ELEMENT Dependent Sources are indicated with a “diamond” symbol, whereas Independent Sources are indicated with a circular symbol. 2
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