BIOL142016 Nov 10 Slides

BIOL142016 Nov 10 Slides - BIOL 14a Kindness Day 2016 small...

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BIOL 14a Kindness Day, 2016: small acts of thanks and kindness Genome-Wide Association Studies and Complex Traits
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Review - WR questions - from Quiz 4
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In lecture, we looked at example of transgenic mice…. After the marker had been introduced into the transgenic mice, if two of these mice were mated, then some of their children would be completely fluorescent . By using this generation, if a fully transgenic mouse water mated with a mixed [chimeric?] transgenic mouse, then some of the mice would be completely transgenic . Even though it was noted in lecture that being transgenic is not the same as being homozygous for a gene , I don't exactly see why these two modes of inheritance are so different from each other.
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I am confused as to when one would use non-targeted integration verses targeted integration . If DNA is injected into the pronucleus of the cell during non-targeted integration, which genes would be transgenic?
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I still have a difficult time understanding the ideas of Targeted and Non-Targeted integration. Does one of them match up to homologous recombination and the other to non-homologous? Also does one oft them relate to negative selection and one to positive selection?
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DNA typing: How?
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Repetitive sequences (VNTRs, STRs) Copy number variations (CNVs) Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLPs) Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) Four common classes of human DNA polymorphisms
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STRs: Short Tandem Repeats number of repetitions varies among individuals 1 aatttttgta ttttttttag agacggggtt tcaccatgtt ggtcaggctg actatggagt 61 tattttaagg ttaatatata taaagggtat gatagaacac ttgtcatagt ttagaacgaa 121 ctaac
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